Archaeological News

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ZIMAPAN, MEXICO.- The finding of a mortuary bundle in a rocky shelter of the oriental part of Sierra Gorda, in the municipality of Zimapan, Hidalgo, that contains the osseous remains of an adult approximately 20 years of age at death, is considered unique in the entity’s archaeology, since they haven´t registered any similar cases.

Archaeologists Juan Manuel Toxtle Farfan and Ariana Aguilar Romero, from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH), informed that the inhabitants of the municipality notified INAH about said finding, which is why INAH experts traveled to the site and could state that given it’s characteristics it could belong to the pre-Hispanic epoch.

Toxtle Farfan added that the finding is not a mummy, because it would still conserve bland tissue, as skin, muscles and tendons, whereas these remains do not. The only thing left are bones, but in an excellent state of conservation. Read more.

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An ancient skeleton unearthed in Israel may contain the oldest evidence of brain damage in a modern human.

The child, who lived about 100,000 years ago, survived head trauma for several years, but suffered from permanent brain damage as a result, new 3D imaging reveals.

Given the brain damage, the child was likely unable to care for himself or herself, so people must have spent years looking after the little boy or girl, according to the researchers who analyzed the 3D images. People from the child’s group left funerary objects in the youngster’s burial pit as well, the study authors said. Read more.

History enthusiasts can find out more about life in Roman Britain by visiting the University of Reading’s Silchester Roman Town Open Days on Saturday, July 26 and Saturday, August 9 this year.

Silchester experts will give tours and talks during the free open days and children can dress-up as Celts or Romans and take part in a mini excavation as well as handle some fascinating finds.

The Roman town, which was founded in the first century AD, was built on the site of an Iron Age town, Calleva. The Roman amphitheatre and town walls are some of the best preserved in Britain, and are open to the public. The town was abandoned some time after 400AD for reasons that are not fully understood. This makes it one of only six Roman towns in Britain that are not still populated. Read more.

The remains of a 14th century medieval manor house are being excavated beneath Walthamstow Stadium’s former car park prior to development of the site.

A section of the car park site opposite the stadium in Chingford Road is currently being excavated by archaeologists from University College London (UCL).

The manor house, known as Salisbury Hall, was demolished in the 1950s.

Salisbury Hall was one of five manor houses in the area built during the 14th century. Read more.

During ongoing excavations in northern Sudan, Polish archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology in Poznań, have discovered the remains of a settlement estimated to 70,000 years old. This find, according to the researchers, seems to contradict the previously held belief that the construction of permanent structures was associated with the so-called Great Exodus from Africa and occupation of the colder regions of Europe and Asia.

The site known as Affad 23, is currently the only one recorded in the Nile Valley which shows that early Homo sapiens built sizeable permanent structures, and had adapted well to the wetland environment.

This new evidence points to a much more advanced level of human development and adaptation in Africa during the Middle Palaeolithic. Read more.

Lima — A number of underground galleries, mausoleums, astronomical tables and human remains were found at the archaeological complex of Wari in Peru’s central Andean region of Ayacucho, reported Jose Ochatoma, lead archaeologist of the excavation project.

Research work is carried around the area, in Monqachayuq and VegachayuqMoqo sectors, where the above-mentioned vestiges were uncovered.

According to Ochatoma, such remains are from the Wari culture, the first Andean empire that then took part of the Incan dominion. Read more.

TEHRAN — An archaeological team, which has been assigned to reconstruct the ancient society of the 5200-year-old Burnt City in a new research project, have found several bizarre burials.

“From 1200 graves, which have been discovered in the Burnt City since 1975 during various archaeological excavations, there are several burials which are very odd and mysterious,” team director Seyyed Mansur Sajjadi told the Persian service of CHN on Monday.

Located 57 kilometers from the Iranian town of Zabol in Sistan-Baluchestan Province, the Burnt City was excavated for the first time by the Istituto Italiano per l’Africa e l’Oriente (IsIAO) team led by Maurizio Tosi in 1967. The team conducted nine seasons of excavations until 1978. Read more.

Excavating two large trenches near Bishop Auckland, experts say a silver ring from the site evidences Christianity in Roman Britain.

The walls of the bath, where features such as a bread oven nod to an important social as well as recreational space, would once have been covered with brightly-coloured paint designs, with the original floor, doorways, window openings and an inscribed altar dedicated to the Roman Goddess, Fortune the Home-bringer, also surfacing.

“The form of the ring and the shape of the stone seem to indicate a 3rd century date,” says Dr David Petts, who is coordinating a project which has entered a fifth week in its sixth year of investigations. Read more.