Archaeological News

            The latest news in archaeology.             

Posts tagged "CT scanners"

CT scanners are being used to help unlock the secrets of five Roman burial urns that were discovered at a housing development in Hertfordshire.

Conservators at the Wiltshire and Swindon History Centre were called in by archaeologists excavating at King Harry Lane in St Albans.

Work is being done to discover whether the remains inside the cremation urns belong to adults or children.

The urns were found at the entrance to a late Iron Age defended settlement.

Micro-excavation

Kelly Abbott, contract conservator with the Wiltshire Council Conservation Service, said: “Unlocking the mystery of these urns could provide a fascinating glimpse of life during the time of the Roman Conquest. Read more.

In a small room lined with shelves of skulls, fossils, bones and antique violins, researchers are using advanced computer imaging to study priceless objects, including a mummy from Peru. So what’s inside?

Some patients find CT scanners and other medical imaging devices claustrophobic.

But this lady, a high-born Peruvian woman in her 40s, was not complaining - she has been dead for about seven centuries. And researchers at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History would like to know a bit more about her.

The nameless woman is one of the best preserved Peruvian mummies anywhere, and the CT scanner allows researchers to peer inside her without damaging her.

The scanner uses x-rays to shoot thousands of images of the object in thin slices. Computer software then reassembles the images to create highly accurate, detailed three-dimensional models and reconstructions. Read more.