Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "archaeology"

The Virgin Mary Monastery, located in the northern province of Giresun’s Şebinkarahisar district, has been undergoing a restoration project and is set to finish this year.

Turkey’s second biggest monastery built out of a mountain, the Virgin Mary Monastery is close to the village of Kayadibi. The restoration started on the monastery in 2006, said Giresun Provincial Culture and Tourism Deputy Director Hüseyin Günaydın, adding, “We plan to open the monastery to faith tourism within a short time.”

The Giresun Museum Director Hulusi Güleç said they estimated that the monastery had served since the 2nd century A.D.

“Christianity was outlawed for 200 years during the Roman era. During this period, Christian clergymen lived in remote places or in areas inside of mountains, like this monastery, to perform their religion. Read more.

A remotely operated vehicle will dive into the Gulf of Mexico to explore three mysterious shipwrecks that may be up to 200 years old, and you can watch the expedition live in a webcast.

Tomorrow (April 24), the ROV will explore debris and artifacts from one of the three ships, which litter the seafloor near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. You can watch the shipwreck expedition webcast on Live Science.

The shipwreck investigation is part of an ongoing exploration of the Gulf of Mexico seafloor by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Okeanos Explorer research vessel. Researchers will search for clues as to whether the ships sunk together and if the wrecks may be significant national maritime heritage sites. Read more.

The lost shipwreck of a passenger steamer that went down near the Golden Gate in San Francisco has been rediscovered.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), announced the discovery of the remains of the SS City of Chester today (April 23). NOAA’s Coast Survey Navigational Response Team 6 inadvertently found the wreck last year while surveying another shipwreck nearby.

The City of Chester was built in 1875 and sank in 1888. Carrying 90 passengers, the ship was steaming away from San Francisco toward Eureka, Calif., on Aug. 22 of that year. The fog that day was dense. Read more.

An interdisciplinary team has used a new technique known as plasma oxidation to produce radiocarbon dates for paint fragments as small as 10 micrograms in width.

Archaeologist and UWA Winthrop Professor Jo McDonald, says her team spent three years documenting rock art sites along the Canning Stock Route, in the eastern Pilbara, at the request of traditional owners.

"A lot of them had had not been visited for a very long time," she says.

"The community hasn’t lived on country since the 1960s – but we had a couple of traditional owners with us who had walked through those areas in the 70s." Read more.

Archaeologists and Native Americans are clashing over Indian remains and artifacts that were excavated during a construction project in the San Francisco Bay Area, but then reburied at an undisclosed location.

Archaeologists say the burial ground and village site in Larkspur held a treasure trove of information about Coast Miwok life and should have been preserved for future study.

But The Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, which made the decision to remove and rebury the remains and artifacts, say the items belonged to their ancestors, and how they are handled is no one’s business but the tribe’s. Read more.

Nine human skeletons have been found by archaeologists excavating land to be used for a water pipeline in Suffolk.

Eight of them, found together near Barnham, are believed to date back to about AD300. Two of the bodies had been buried with a brooch and a knife.

The other skeleton was discovered at Rougham.

Anglian Water, which is installing a new pipeline to serve Bury St Edmunds, said items from the dig would be “kept in a secure museum archive”.

The dig took five months and also unearthed evidence of Anglo Saxon “grub huts” from the 6th Century, near Barnham. Read more.

A 174-year-old marble globe in the middle of Istanbul’s historical peninsula went missing last month, daily Milliyet reported on April 22.

The globe came from a shrine, ordered to be built by Ottoman Sultan Abdülmecid for his father Mahmud II in the Çemberlitaş neighborhood in 1840. The Ottoman-Armenian royal architects Ohannes and Bogos Dadyan completed the shrine in empirical style, including a 2.5-meter high drinking fountain on one of its corners, which was also decorated with a 70 cm-wide marble globe.

Officials from the Directorate of Shrines cannot explain how the globe was lost. Read more.

A cave located on Spain’s Canary Islands, in what was probably the aboriginal region of Artevigua, could reveal an unsuspected knowledge of astronomy by the ancient islanders since it marks equinoxes and solstices, while inside it the light recreates images related to fertility.

The cave was used as a temple and, besides its astronomical function, the light creates in its interior a mythological account of fertility, the likes of which exist nowhere else in the world,” archaeologist Julio Cuenca, who has investigated the area since the 1990s, said.

“It’s like a projector of images from a vanished culture,” Cuenca told Efe, adding that during a six-month period the light creates phallic images on cave walls that are covered with engravings of female pubic triangles. Read more.