Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "artifacts"

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New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art currently houses hundreds of artifacts from the Mochica culture— and Peru wants them back.

Peruvian cultural artifacts are making their way home from all over the world— Sweden’s return of the Paracas textiles being a particularly high-profile incidence of repatriation. Now, the regional government of Piura is looking to get back 400 pieces currently housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

El Comercio reports that the pieces in question were found in the Loma Negra cemetery, an area in which a number of Mochica elite were buried. Grave robbers sacked the tombs in the 1960s, and no extensive investigation into the site has been carried out, writes El Comercio. Read more.

Archaeologists working at the Huaca de la Luna have unearthed a previously unknown tomb belonging to a Mochica ruler.

According to El Comercio, the tomb, which contained the remains of an adult male, held a number of objects indicating the man’s elite status.

El Comercio reports that the body was accompanied by a copper scepter similar to the one found with the Lord of Sipan. Bronze earrings, a mask, and ceremonial ceramics were also found.

The most interesting artifacts, however, were small pieces made to look like feline jaws and paws. El Comercio reports that the animal body parts may have been part of a ritual costume used in ceremonial combat. Read more.

Two shipments of stolen Egyptian artefacts spanning the eras of the pharaohs and the Mamluks have been returned to Egypt, thanks to efforts from diplomatic officials.

The first consists of eight Islamic wooden art decorations stolen in 2008 from the pulpit of Ghanim Al-Bahlawan Mosque in Al-Darb Al-Ahmar in Cairo’s historic Islamic district.

Ghanim Al-Bahlawan Mosque, named after the Circassian Mamluk, was constructed in 1478 AD during the reign of Sultan Qait Bey. The decorative items depict geometrical patterns embellished with ivory. Read more.

BLOOMFIELD, N.M. (AP) — Workers widening a northwestern New Mexico highway bordering an archaeological site found artifacts that officials said might be from the ancient Puebloan culture.

The pottery pieces and fragments of charcoal, burned corn fibers and other material were found last week when a laborer noticed something red and black glinting in the sun, the Daily Times reported Sunday.

The Mountain States Constructors Inc. crew was widening U.S. Highway 64 along the Salmon Ruins in Bloomfield when workers made the find.

Hector Beyale reported the discovery to a supervisor who alerted Salmon Ruins Executive Director Larry Baker. Read more.

More than 10,600 artifacts dating from Neolithic times that were removed illegally by Nazi archaeologists during World War II have been returned to Greece from the German Pfahlbaumuseum, the state-run Athens-Macedonia News Agency (AMNA) reported on Tuesday.

The items were officially handed back to Greece during a low-key ceremony attended by Greek and German officials in Athens, including Culture Minister Constantinos Tasoulas, German Ambassador to Athens Wolfgang Dold and Pfahlbaumuseum Director Gunter Schoebel.

The return of the artifacts, most of which were excavated in the Thessaly region in 1941 during an operation organized by Hitler’s chief ideologist Alfred Rosenberg, arose from a doctoral thesis by Angelica Douzougli, an honorary ephor of antiquities. She located the artifacts in the 1970s over the course of research conducted in Germany and has since spearheaded the campaign for their repatriation. Read more.

Have a look at any ancient artefact and there’s probably something there that you cannot see: stone corners that have long since chipped off; carvings rubbed away by time; or once-glorious colours that have faded. Now those missing features can be brought back to life, thanks to Revealing Flashlight, a system that projects computer-generated models on to real objects, filling in missing details wherever its spotlight lands.

The system has been piloted at the Allard Pierson Museum at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, where it illuminated lost pigmentation on a fragment from an Egyptian tomb. It has also been used to highlight the contours of a 3D-printed replica of a statue of Isis from the Lighthouse of Alexandria, and to help viewers decipher inscriptions on an Egyptian stela. Read more.

MADRID (Reuters) - Spain returned to Colombia on Tuesday 691 archaeological pieces including 3,000-year-old ceramics that were seized in 2003 in a drug-trafficking and money-laundering case.

The pieces - including busts, statues and stone jewelry - were housed for 11 years in Madrid’s Museum of America while courts decided who their rightful owner was after they were illegally exported from Colombia.

The South American country made an official petition to repatriate the objects and Spain’s High Court ruled on June 10 that they be turned over to the Colombian government’s archaeological authorities. Read more.

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Today, after winning a lawsuit in court in London, Egypt’s embassy in the UK received 12 ancient Egyptian artefacts that were stolen and illegally smuggled out of the country in the aftermath of the January 2011 revolution.

Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim, who described the court verdict as “historic,” told Ahram Online that the artefacts in question are now in the Egyptian embassy and are due to arrive in Cairo at the end of June.

The artefacts include a granite relief depicting a Nubian scene that was a decorative element at the base of a statue of King Amenhotep III discovered in 2000 by a German archaeological mission at the king’s funerary temple in Luxor’s West Bank. Read more.