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Posts tagged "britain"

THE largest haul of treasure ever found in the UK, which was discovered in Worcestershire three years ago, will be on display for years to come thanks to a generous grant from a museum charity.

The stash of almost 4,000 Roman coins was found in Bredon Hill by metal detecting enthusiasts in June 2011.

Now Worcestershire County Council’s archive and archaeology service has been handed a £5,000 grant by the Treasure Plus programme, meaning work can commence to conserve the find – popularly known as the Bredon Hoard.

Research undertaken by the archaeology and archives service alongside the British Museum has suggested the hoard was buried nearly a century after it was accumulated – the only stash of its kind ever found in Britain. Read more.

History enthusiasts can find out more about life in Roman Britain by visiting the University of Reading’s Silchester Roman Town Open Days on Saturday, July 26 and Saturday, August 9 this year.

Silchester experts will give tours and talks during the free open days and children can dress-up as Celts or Romans and take part in a mini excavation as well as handle some fascinating finds.

The Roman town, which was founded in the first century AD, was built on the site of an Iron Age town, Calleva. The Roman amphitheatre and town walls are some of the best preserved in Britain, and are open to the public. The town was abandoned some time after 400AD for reasons that are not fully understood. This makes it one of only six Roman towns in Britain that are not still populated. Read more.

The physical scars left by the Western front in Belgium and France during the First World War continue to fascinate historians and tourists who flock to these former battlefields. But according to a professor at Huddersfield University there are a surprising number of similarly preserved remnants of trenches still to be discovered in Britain.

Richard Morris, who is a Professor of History at the University of Huddersfield, says it is even possible to find evidence of trench systems in remote areas of Britain that mirrored those of the Western Front.

“During the Great War, they built whole stretches of the front in England, in order to train troops before they went overseas,” explained Professor Morris. “Sometimes, live ammunition was used, so that the troops knew what was in store for them”. Read more.

Archaeologists were stunned to discover evidence of a Mesolithic settlement alongside the A1, which stretches 410 miles from London to Edinburgh.

The site, near Catterick in North Yorkshire, is believed to have been used by people travelling north and south as an overnight shelter, similar to today’s motorway service stations.

Items discovered at the settlement include flint tools that date back to between 6000 and 8000 BC.

Archaeologist Steve Sherlock said: “This was a place that people knew of – a place they could return to on many occasions to stay overnight during their travels. Read more.

Britain’s rich maritime legacy is under threat from commercial treasure hunters who are accused by experts of plundering and destroying the nation’s underwater heritage.

A group of leading archaeologists and historians warn that unless the government intervenes to protect scores of historically significant wrecks lying beyond the country’s territorial waters, sites including the graves of those lost at sea could be exploited and lost for good.

On Monday the group, which includes leading scholars from Oxford University and the British Museum, will call on the Foreign Office, the Ministry of Defence and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to sign up to a United Nations treaty on protecting underwater remains. Read more.

Human remains dug up from an ancient grave in Oxfordshire add to a growing body of evidence that Britain’s fifth-century transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon was cultural rather than bloody.

The traditional historical narrative is one of brutal conquest, with invaders from the North wiping out and replacing the pre-existing population.

But a new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, hints at a more peaceful process. Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, is one of the study’s authors.

'The main controversy over the years has centred on how many Anglo-Saxons came across the North Sea,' he says. Read more.

A new look at a cache of baby bones discovered in Britain is altering assumptions about why ancient Romans committed infanticide.

Infant girls were apparently not killed more often than baby boys, researchers report in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science.

"Very often, societies have preferred male offspring, so when they practice infanticide, it tends to be the male babies that are kept, and the female babies that are killed," said study researcher Simon Mays, a skeletal biologist for English Heritage, a non-governmental organization that protects historic sites.

Though ancient Romans indeed preferred boys, there is no evidence they went as far as infanticide to skew the sex ratio, Mays told LiveScience. Read more.

A trio of archeologists has found that a human femur unearthed in a cave in the early 1990s, in northern Britain dates back to over 10,000 years ago. The combined team of researchers from the University of Nottingham and Liverpool John Moores University has documented their findings in a paper they’ve had published in Journal of Quaternary Science.

Up until now, remains from humans living in Britain during a warming spell at the end of the last Ice Age, have been confined to caves in the south. Tools and other artifacts have confirmed that people were living in the north as well, but up till now, none of their remains have been found. The bone piece-part of a femur, was found in a cave almost 25 years ago in Cumbria (Kents Bank Cavern) and has since been housed at the Dock Museum. Read more.