Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "bronze"

OSAKA, Jan. 24 (Xinhua) — A team of Japanese archaeologists has found a bronze comma-shaped bead, which is believed to be the oldest of its kind in the country’s history, in the western Japanese city of Tottori, local press reported on Thursday.

The metal curved bead, dating back to the early sixth century, was excavated from one of the tombs built in the early sixth 6 century at the Matsubara No. 10 Mound in the city according to the daily Mainichi Shimbun.

The city said the team has uncovered an area of about 1,100 square meters in the site since May 2012, adding that its members discovered the greenish colored artifact, which weighs 1.6 grams and is 1.71 centimeters long and 0.6 centimeters wide, together with about 20 glass beads during the excavation work for the tomb. Read more.

In the first exhibition of its kind, the Fitzwilliam Museum will relate the story of the quest for immortality and struggle for imperial legitimacy in ancient China’s Han Dynasty.

The Search for Immortality: Tomb Treasures of Han China (May 5-November 11) will feature over 350 treasures in jade, gold, silver, bronze and ceramics in the largest and most important exhibition of ancient royal treasures ever to travel outside China.

The Han Dynasty established the basis for unified rule of China up to the present day. To maintain this hard-won empire the Han emperors had to engage in a constant struggle for power and legitimacy, with contests that took place on symbolic battlefields as much as on real ones. While written accounts provide an outline of these events, it is through the stunning archaeological discoveries of recent decades that the full drama and spectacle of this critical episode in Chinese history has been brought to life. Read more.

Some 9,500 ancient coins, mostly made of bronze, were confiscated by the police authorities of Chalkidiki after the last case of antiquities smuggling ring was exposed a few days ago.

The archaeologists of the Ministry of Culture and Tourism have completed the counting of the findings and have already begun the scientific documentation of the confiscated ancient artifacts, which have been transported to the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki.

The majority of the coins comes from the broader Northern Greece region and dates back from the Byzantine era to the 5th century BC. Among the coins, several silver coins have also been found, mostly tetradrachms from the 4th century BC, cut by the Chalkidian Alliance and Phillipos II. Read more.

Sofia. Since 5th century a saint’s hairs have been kept in a bronze reliquary, a cross, which has been unearthed in the ancient Thracian city of Perperikon, Southern Bulgaria, archaeologist professor Nikolay Ovcharov told FOCUS News Agency in relation with the most recent find in Perperikon – a bronze reliquary dating back to the 5-6 century.

According to the archaeologist the cross was discovered two or three days ago in a very impressive building on the southern slope of Perperikon.
“The building was made in the antiquity, but it was functioning until the 10-12 century. We unearth it now and it is yet to be discovered entirely. A week ago I presented there the seals of archbishop Achridos of the eastern Rhodope mountains, as they were called in the Middle Ages, and now a bronze cross was discovered,” he said further.

He added the cross is about 4 cm high and was sealed hermetically. Read more.

A bronze sculpture more than 430 years old was found on the Pacific coast in the northwestern Mexican state of Baja California, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said.

The discovery was made by INAH members and researchers from the United States two weeks ago and is a unique piece within the collection of goods recovered over a 12-year period by the Manila Galleon Project in Baja California.

The sculpture, 12 centimeters (4 3/4 inches) tall and of an equal width, represents a Chinese “Dog of Fo,” and the first analyses have determined that it is either the lid of a censer or a candlestick.

The find comes from one of the first galleons of the 16th century to set sail from Manila in the Philippines en route to Acapulco in the Viceroyalty of New Spain, INAH marine archaeology unit member Roberto Junco said. Read more.

Archeologists in Croatia have identified what they believe is the world’s only triple-barrel cannon inspired by the inventions of Leonardo da Vinci.

The bronze cannon, from the late 15th century, bears a striking resemblance to sketches drawn by the Renaissance inventor, notably in his Codex Atlanticus - the largest collection of his drawings and writing.

Mounted on a wooden carriage and wheels, it would have allowed a much more rapid rate of fire than traditional single-barreled guns - in a precursor to modern day machine guns. Soldiers would have been able to fire three cannon balls instead of one.

It was also lighter and more mobile than most cannon of the time, enabling troops to move it around the battlefield with comparative ease - a precursor to much later artillery.

It was found in the grounds of the 15th century Klicevica fortress, in a part of southern Croatia that had strong trading links with the Venetian Republic and that was on the front line of defence against the invading Ottomon Turks. Read more.

Today the tourism and antiquities police succeeded in retrieving four ancient Egyptian artefacts, two of which were reported missing from the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir.

The criminals were caught red-handed.

Zahi Hawass, minister of state for antiquities affairs, assigned an archaeological committee headed by the Egyptian Museum Director, Tarek El-Awadi, to check on the authenticity of such pieces and whether they belong to the Egyptian museum.

Hawass told Ahram Online that the four bronze statutes date to the Late Period.

Two of them were from the Egyptian Museum that was looted during the January 25 Revolution. The statutes depict the god of prosperity, Osiris, and the other two feature the god Harpocrate, which represents the god Osiris in his childhood.

El-Awadi confirms that the other two are authentic items, but not from those on the list of the objects that are reported missing after the January Revolution. The committee is now investigating whether they are from any museum or archaeological site in Egypt. Read more.

BEIJING: An unknown kingdom dating back to 1046 B.C. has been unearthed in north China, archaeologists said.

The kingdom is probably from the Xizhou dynasty (1046 to 771 B.C.), Xinhua reported.

Engraving on bronze wares found in tombs in Shanxi province’s Linfen city indicate that the region was reigned by Ba Bo, or Count of the Ba kingdom, the archaeologists said.

The Ba kingdom had never been seen in any historical record before, they said. Read more.