Archaeological News

            The latest news in archaeology.       

    

counter for tumblr
Posts tagged "bronze age"

image

Emmet’s Post, named after one of several pillars built to divide Lee and Shaugh Moors in 1835, is being investigated as part of a government-approved quarry expansion on the edge of Dartmoor.

The mound of the post, on the boundaries of a china clay pit, was confirmed as a Bronze Age bowl barrow during a dig in 2011. Oxford Archaeology have been granted Scheduled Monument Consent by English Heritage in a bid to discover how the site was constructed and used over the centuries.

‘‘The barrow at Emmets Post, with its slightly hollowed-out top, is not the best-preserved of these Bronze Age monuments,” said Andrew Josephs, an archaeologist for Sibelco, the minerals firm paying for the project. Read more.

Archaeologists have discovered signs of human habitation, possibly dating back 4,000 years, on Sligo’s Coney Island.

A box-like structure built from large stone slabs found on the island may have been used for bathing or cooking during the Bronze Age, experts believe. It has been excavated by a team led by Eamonn Kelly, director of Irish Antiquities at the National Museum.

The structure is thought to be part of a fulacht fiadh, a prehistoric trough or pit that was dug into the ground and filled with water. Stones, heated separated on an outdoor hearth, would be added to bring the water to boil. Read more.

Excavations in the Seyitömer tumulus in the western province of Kütahya have uncovered a brush and baby rattle, which are estimated to date back 5,000 years.

The artifacts were found by Dumlupınar University (DPU) Archaeology Department in a plot of land owned by a private company involved in coal mining.

“We found a brush here. The parts, where animal hairs are attached, are made of clay. It is a triangle brush adorned with motifs. They were used in the ceramic production in the early Bronze Age. The other item is a toy that makes the sound of a rattle when you shake it. It dates back to 3,000 B.C. Read more.

A museum in California has returned 557 bronze-age pots to Thailand after an investigation found they were smuggled out of the South-East Asian country, a news report said on Tuesday.

The Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California sent them back after signing a non-prosecution agreement with the US district attorney, Thairath reported.

US authorities found that the pots were smuggled from a UNESCO heritage archaeological site in Udon Thani, around 600 kilometres north-east of Bangkok.

The small, earthenware pots, in a variety of conditions, had arrived back in the country and were undergoing inspection for authenticity, the report said. (source)

image

In the late third millenium BC, society in south-eastern Arabia began to change.

The environment grew extremely arid and trade with Mesopotamia was in decline.

People began to abandon settlements, leave palm gardens and, supposedly, return to a mobile lifestyle.

The Bronze Age transition from the Umm An Nar (2700 to 2000 BC) to the Wadi Suq (2000 to 1300 BC) period is hotly debated by archaeologists.

The popular view is that external forces – such as acute climate change and the breakdown of trade between regions – caused people to leave Umm An Nar centres and form smaller, more mobile communities in the early second millennium. 

Dramatic changes in the archaeological record suggest people adjusted to climate change with a sudden shift. Read more.

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of at least two bodies in a Bronze Age burial cist in a remote area of the west Highlands.

They were previously aware of one body in the ancient grave on the Ardnamurchan peninsula but they have now found more bones than could belong to another person.

A skull found during an earlier archaeological dig at Swordle in 2010 was dated as being from around 1700BC.

And the bones discovered during the Ardnamurchan Transition Project team’s visit to the area this summer have now been sent away for radiocarbon dating. Read more.

PERTH.- A stunning exhibition of treasures once thought lost to the world opened at the Western Australian Museum, Perth.

WA Museum CEO Alec Coles said the Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul exhibition contained more than 200 rare and beautiful objects dating back to the Bronze Age, from a place that was once at the crossroads of the world’s great civilisations.

“Standing as it did at the heart of the ancient Silk Road, Afghanistan was the historic link between Iran, Central Asia, India, and China and became a trading place for gold, glass, ceramics and precious stones with civilisations as far away as Rome, Greece and even Egypt,” Mr Coles said.

“The objects in this exhibition span 2,000 years of exquisite craftsmanship, and the fact we even have them here at all is an incredible story in itself.” These objects were thought to have been stolen or destroyed during Afghanistan’s years of conflict, when thousands of irreplaceable antiquities were lost. But a brave group of five staff from the National Museum in Kabul hid them, risking their lives to save their cultural heritage for future generations. (source)

An Iron Age hearth and evidence of a Bronze Age settlement have been uncovered in Porthleven by builders working on a new housing development.

Archaeologists have been working alongside the contractors developing land off Shrubberies Hill and have been excited by the find.

Community archaeologist Richard Mikulski said of the Iron Age hearth: “It’s quite a big deal. It’s the first ever find in Cornwall and there’s only one other example that we know of that’s sort of similar found in the south west, if not the country, found at Glastonbury at the end of the 19th century. Read more.