Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "bronze age"

An Iron Age hearth and evidence of a Bronze Age settlement have been uncovered in Porthleven by builders working on a new housing development.

Archaeologists have been working alongside the contractors developing land off Shrubberies Hill and have been excited by the find.

Community archaeologist Richard Mikulski said of the Iron Age hearth: “It’s quite a big deal. It’s the first ever find in Cornwall and there’s only one other example that we know of that’s sort of similar found in the south west, if not the country, found at Glastonbury at the end of the 19th century. Read more.

Children’s skulls found at the edges of Bronze Age settlements may have been a gruesome gift for the local lake gods.

The children’s skulls were discovered encircling the perimeter of ancient villages around lakes in Switzerland and Germany. Some had suffered ax blows and other head traumas.

Though the children probably weren’t human sacrifices killed to appease the gods, they may have been offered after death as gifts to ward off flooding, said study co-author Benjamin Jennings, an archaeologist at Basel University in Switzerland. Read more.

A new technique to identify the type of shell used to make early, decorative beads could help archaeologists understand more about early human trading.

UK researchers used the new technique to analyse beads discovered in an Early Bronze Age grave near Sudbury in Suffolk. The grave is thought to have belonged to a young woman.

Next to her head, archaeologists found thousands of beads placed in a particular black and white, zebra-stripe pattern. The archaeologists worked out that some of the beads were made of jet and amber, but they couldn’t figure out what many of the white beads were made from. Read more.

Unlike most hunter-gatherer societies of the Bronze Age, the people of the Baikal region of modern Siberia (Russia) respected their dead with formal graves. These burial sites are a treasure trove for archaeologists and one particular specimen was so unique that bioarchaeologist Angela Lieverse traveled across the world just to bring it back to the Canadian Light Source synchrotron for examination.

"I’ve conducted research with the Baikal-Hokkaido Archaeology Project since the late nineties, and this specimen really intrigued me," said Lieverse, associate professor at the University of Saskatchewan. "I’ve known about this skull for about 10 years and there are a couple things about it that are fascinating."

The first, she said, is that this individual is missing the two front teeth on the lower jaw. And the second is that there is an obvious stone projectile tip embedded in the exact same spot of the mandible where the two incisors should be. Read more.

A new study by scientists at the University of York has shed new light on the use of mollusc shells as personal adornments by Bronze Age people.

The research team used amino acid racemisation analysis (a technique used previously mainly for dating artefacts), light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, to identify the raw materials used to make beads in a complex necklace discovered at an Early Bronze Age burial site at Great Cornard in Suffolk, UK.

They discovered that Bronze Age craftspeople used species like dog whelk and tusk shells, both of which were likely to have been sourced and worked locally, to fashion tiny disc-shaped beads in the necklace. The research is published in PLOS ONE. Read more.

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An archaeological dig conducted by Queensland University in 2014, in the location of Mouttes in Alambra, in Nicosia District, has confirmed the existence of an ancient settlement revealing remains of buildings and tombs dating back to the Bronze Age.

The research conducted during 2014 is the continuation of the work that had been conducted by the Australian mission at the same site during 2012, a Department of Antiquities press release says.

It is further noted that the site “had been identified as preserving the remains of an Early and Middle Bronze Age settlement already since the 19th century”. Read more.

4,000-year-old pottery from the early Bronze Age, the remains of timber roundhouses and evidence of Iron Age smithing are among the discoveries made by archaeologists investigating a proposed park and ride site near Aberdeen.

The Archaeological dig undertaken by AECOM and Headland Archaeology ahead of construction work on the “Park and Choose” site, which is being developed as part of new link road, took place on a “relatively undisturbed” site where archaeological discoveries have been made in the past.

Their finds suggest agricultural, industrial and domestic activity, and show that the site was used from the early Bronze Age (2300BC) right through to the 1800s. Read more.

A day of digging undertaken by three expert archaeologists has unearthed over sixty objects from a one-metre square excavation at Land’s End, after the site was uncovered by digging rabbits.

In February, the wild rabbits at Land’s End accidentally uncovered a collection of flint scrapers and arrowheads while burrowing their warrens.

The discovery prompted Land’s End to commission a thorough archaeological investigation of their land and now the finds discovered and compiled by Big Heritage UK have revealed evidence of an iron-age hill fort, a bronze-age barrow cemetery and a Neolithic passage grave. Read more.