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Posts tagged "burial site"

THE MYSTERY behind human skeletons discovered in the city centre 50 years ago could finally be solved after a Nottingham archaeologist secured funding to further his research.

Scott Lomax has been studying the burial site of around 70 bodies at the site of Cranbrook House, in Cranbrook Street, for the past five years.

The little-known burial ground is on the edge of the Lace Market.

The skeletons were discovered during 1962 and 1963 during construction work of Cranbrook House – now a block of serviced apartments.

The remains were partially exhumed by archaeologists but the history behind the site is still unknown.

Mr Lomax said: “It has always been a mystery why 70 or more individuals were seemingly hurriedly buried just outside the Lace Market. Read more.

Human remains have been found during an archaeological dig in Clare Castle Country Park, revealing the location of a Christian burial site previously unknown to historians.

The three sets of remains were found during a nine-day dig led by a team of ten archaeologists from Access Cambridge Archaeology (ACA).

The dig, which saw four trenches excavated at different locations within the grounds of Clare Castle, was part of the Managing a Masterpiece project, which aims to find out more about the history of the Stour Valley landscape and discover how traditional land management has shaped it.

Leading the archaeologists and the 120 or so volunteers who turned up to help during the course of the excavations was ACA director, Dr Carenza Lewis, well known for her TV appearances on Time Team. Read more.

COLIMA.- A burial site with the osseous remains of some 28 individuals, whose antiquity is estimated to be around 1,500 and 2,500 years, was discovered by archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) east of the city of Colima. The quantity of skeletons found here lead archaeologists to believe this is a pre Hispanic burial site related to western cultures.

Marco Zavaleta Lucido, an archaeologist of the INAH Center in Colima, explained that this area, of about 114 meters square [374.01 square feet], has burials distributed inside and outside of a shaft tomb. The tomb consists of a funerary complex made up by a vertical well of varying depth that leads to a vault where the dead were deposited. Inside this tomb they located the osseous remains of 10 individuals; around it they found 16 other burials, two of which are double having two skeletons. Read more.

Centuries before the first massive sarsen stone was hauled into place at Stonehenge, the world’s most famous prehistoric monument may have begun life as a giant burial ground, according to a theory disclosed on Saturday.

More than 50,000 cremated bone fragments, of 63 individuals buried at Stonehenge, have been excavated and studied for the first time by a team led by archaeologist Professor Mike Parker Pearson, who has been working at the site and on nearby monuments for decades. He now believes the earliest burials long predate the monument in its current form.

The first bluestones, the smaller standing stones, were brought from Wales and placed as grave markers around 3,000BC, and it remained a giant circular graveyard for at least 200 years, with sporadic burials after that, he claims. Read more.

A Carthaginian burial site was not for child sacrifice but was instead a graveyard for babies and fetuses, researchers now say.

A new study of the ancient North African site offers the latest volley in a debate over the primary purpose of the graveyard, long thought to be a place of sacred sacrifice.

"It’s all very great, cinematic stuff, but whether that was a constant daily activity ― I think our analysis contradicts that," said study co-author Jeffrey Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh.

The city-state of Carthage was founded in the ninth century B.C., when Queen Dido fled Phoenicia (along the eastern Mediterranean shore) for what is now Tunis, Tunisia. The empire became a powerhouse of the ancient world and fought several wars against the Romans. Read more.

ARCHAEOLOGISTS have embarked on an excavation to unlock the mysteries of an ancient and iconic Welsh burial site.

Staff and students from the University of Chester and fellow specialists from Bangor University, have started the third phase of Project Eliseg at. Llangollen.

The team are hoping to unearth the secrets of a ninth-century stone monument on a prehistoric mound at The Pillar of Eliseg near Valle Crucis Abbey in Llangollen.

Professor Nancy Edwards of Bangor University’s School of History, Welsh History and Archaeology, said: ”The main aim of the project is to better understand this enigmatic monument and how it was used and reused over time.” Read more.

The tomb of a high-ranking member of Zapotec society was found at a 1,200-year-old funerary complex in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, the National Anthropology and History Institute, or INAH, said.

The funerary complex, which has three burial chambers, was found about three months ago at the Atzompa archaeological zone, the INAH said.

Archaeologists managed to get into the third pre-Columbian burial chamber, which contained human remains that are likely those of a male, INAH archaeology coordinator Nelly Robles Garcia said.

The remains will be analyzed to determine the age, nutrition and health of the individual, as well as whether there are intentional deformities of a cultural nature. Read more.

The Sechelt Nation will fight to save an ancient chieftain burial site found at the mouth of Salmon Inlet, described as one of the most important archeological discoveries in the province.

“We’ve proven without a shadow of a doubt this site is one of the most important in British Columbia — one of the most important for showing the development of chiefly status, and it’s right here,” Dr. Terence Clark of the Canadian Museum of Civilization said during Archeology Day at the Sechelt Indian Band (SIB) hall July 29.

He said archeologists have worked in the area every summer for the past three years through a partnership with the Sechelt Indian Band (SIB), the museum and the University of Toronto. Each year new burials and artifacts are found that point to the significance of the site. Read more.