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Posts tagged "china"

Even as he conquered rival kingdoms to create the first united Chinese empire in 221 B.C., China’s First Emperor Qin Shihuang ordered the building of a glorious underground palace complex, mirroring his imperial capital near present-day Xi’an, that would last for an eternity.

To protect his underworld palaces, the First Emperor issued instructions that his imperial guard be replicated, down to the finest details, in red-brown terracotta clay, poised to do battle. Thousands of these imperial guards were initially discovered in 1974; some contained patches of pigment that had survived 22 centuries buried underground, along with minute remnants of binding media that had aided in the creation of this polychrome Terracotta Army.

Efforts to conserve, and perhaps even restore, these remarkable examples of sculpture in the round from the first empire have been hampered by the failure of a series of scientific experiments to pinpoint the binding material used in applying pigments to Qin Shihuang’s underground army. Read more.

An ancient bronze ware item that had been floating around overseas for nearly a century was finally returned to China yesterday from the New York-based fine arts auction house Christie’s after an agreement was made with Chinese collectors.

The bronze item is a body of a wine vessel known as Minfanglei and is considered to represent one of the greatest pieces in the golden era of Chinese bronze in the Shang Dynasty (1600 BC -1046 BC), according to CRI. Before now, China only had the lid on display. Both pieces will now be preserved at the Hunan Provincial Museum. Read more.

For thousands of years, Mother Nature has taken the blame for tremendous human suffering caused by massive flooding along the Yellow River, long known in China as the “River of Sorrow” and “Scourge of the Sons of Han.”

Now, new research from Washington University in St. Louis links the river’s increasingly deadly floods to a widespread pattern of human-caused environmental degradation and related flood-mitigation efforts that began changing the river’s natural flow nearly 3,000 years ago.

"Human intervention in the Chinese environment is relatively massive, remarkably early and nowhere more keenly witnessed than in attempts to harness the Yellow River," said T.R. Kidder, PhD, lead author of the study and an archaeologist at Washington University. Read more.

NANJING — Archaeologists have discovered more than 100 Eastern Han Dynasty (24-220 AD) tombs in east China’s Jiangsu Province.

The graves in Pizhou City are mostly two meters long and a meter wide, They lie under a large pool and were found when the pool was drained, Ma Yongqiang, a researcher with the Institute of Archaeology of Nanjing Museum told Xinhua on Saturday.

Such a large cluster of Han tombs are a rare discovery and valuable for studies on funeral customs of the time. The tombs were buried only 20 to 30 centimeters beneath the earth and about two dozens have been plundered. Read more.

Two men whose remains were recently excavated from tombs in western China put their pants on one leg at a time, just like the rest of us. But these nomadic herders did so between 3,300 and 3,000 years ago, making their trousers the oldest known examples of this innovative apparel, a new study finds.

With straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch, the ancient wool trousers resemble modern riding pants, says a team led by archaeologists Ulrike Beck and Mayke Wagner of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. The discoveries, uncovered in the Yanghai graveyard in China’s Tarim Basin, support previous work suggesting that nomadic herders in Central Asia invented pants to provide bodily protection and freedom of movement for horseback journeys and mounted warfare, the scientists report May 22 in Quaternary International. Read more.

Newly analyzed artifacts and a 200-year-old journal reveal the remarkable tale of the first American citizen to enter China’s Forbidden City and meet the emperor.

The mission was based on a diplomatic deception, and lives would be lost on the journey, but in 1795 Andreas Everardus van Braam Houckgeest would get to see the Forbidden City, a palace complex of more than 900 buildings that was off-limits even to most Chinese. He saw it at a time when China was wealthy and at the height of its power.

At one point Houckgeest was shown to the emperor’s favorite apartment, which gave him a view of a mountain covered with temples. Read more.

The catchment of Hanjiang River is regarded as one of the most important Paleolithic sites in central China. During 2009-2012, a scientific team led by Dr. WANG Shejiang, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, conducted surveys and discovered two new Paleolithic open-air sites in the Hanzhong Basin. Researchers unearthed 252 stone artifacts, and reported the finding in the journal of Acta Anthropologica Sinica 2014 (2).

This study indicates hominins already occupied the Hanzhong Basin from approximately 600000 years ago, and provides important data for the study of human adaptive strategies and patterns in this region and as well as the Palaeolithic culture and human behavior in East Asia. Read more.

It’s a rare treat when a treasure can be found within a treasure. ┬áThat’s exactly what happened when archaeologists uncovered a hidden gem, buried deep inside a centuries-old, thousand-hand bodhisattva statue in south west China, at the Dazu Rock Carvings.

Engraved tablets, golden foil and pieces of porcelain retrieved from the inside of one of China’s most prized treasures.

They were uncovered from this thousand-hand bodhisattva, the most famous among the The Dazu Rock Carvings.

Archaeologists discovered a chamber in the abdomen of the statue. Within, they found a stone tablet with red engravings on it. The engravings are dated to the reign of Emperor Qianlong, over 300 years ago. Read more.