Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "egypt"

The Egyptian foreign ministry handed over “samples stolen in the Cheops pyramid” to the antiquities ministry, said the state news agency MENA.

The fragments had been in Germany before being returned to Egypt. They were handed over to Egyptian authorities at the country’s embassy in Berlin.

Former antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim said in December “German researchers, helped by an Egyptian guide had taken samples of stone, as well as fragments of a tablet bearing the name of the Pharaoh Cheops” in the pyramid. The tablet was the only one in the pyramid showing the Pharaoh’s name. Read more.

More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest.

She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore “a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head,” writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology.

Researchers don’t know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds of people, including many others whose hairstyles are still intact, who were buried in a cemetery near an ancient city now called Amarna. Read more.

Marina Al-Alamein is a well-known summer resort on Egypt’s north coast where holidaymakers can enjoy sun, sand and sea in the summertime.

Now, another tourist attraction can be added as the antiquities ministry has resumed restoration work at the archaeological site of Marina Al-Alamein, which was a major Greco-Roman town and port known as Leucaspis 2000 years ago.

Leucaspis was probably destroyed by an earthquake in the late third century AD, but was partially inhabited again in the fifth and sixth centuries AD. A small basilica church uncovered in the eastern sector is considered to be the best evidence of this later occupation. Read more.

THE GIZA Plateau was a hive of activity yesterday as workers supervised by restorers and Egyptologists installed iron scaffolding around the body of the Sphinx, 16 years after the decade-long project to restore it ended in 1998, writes Nevine El-Aref.

The director general of Giza Monuments, Kamal Wahid, explains that the conservation work includes two sections of the Sphinx’s body: a 24-cm wide block in the rear that was last restored in the late-Pharaonic period and has slid out of position; and a 31-cm-wide section of the neck affected by air pollution and erosion. “This is a periodical maintenance of the great Sphinx which will last for only two months,” said Wahid. Read more.

On Tuesday morning, Google unveiled Street View Egypt in Google Maps, the latest step in the tech giant’s quest to image and map the seven wonders of the world. This new collection includes 360-degree views of the Great Pyramids of Giza, the necropolis of Saqqara, the Citadel of Qaitbay, the Cairo Citadel, the Hanging Church and the ancient city of Abu Mena.

Google Street View began in 2007 and has since covered more than 7.2 million unique miles across more than 59 countries, gathering tens of millions of images that cover iconic landmarks and monuments, including the Taj Mahal, Angkor Wat, the Galapagos Islands, Everest Base Camp, the Grand Canyon and the Colosseum. Read more.

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Activists are angry with Egypt’s Minister of Antiquities, Mamdouh Eldamaty, for choosing to re-hire a company to restore one of Egypt’s oldest pyramids after the firm caused damage and major deterioration to the structure while trying to repair it.

According to the Non-Stop Robberies movement, the famous Step Pyramid of Djoser, located in the Saqqara necropolis, sustained serious damage while being restored by a company called Shurbagy. This led to major deterioration and the collapse of a section of the pyramid.

"New walls were built outside the pyramid as if the pyramid were a modern construction, which is opposite to international standards of restoration, which prevents adding more than 5% of construction to antiquities if necessary. Read more.

On 2nd February 1925, the photographer from the Harvard-Boston archaeological expedition was setting up his camera tripod on the rocky plateau of Giza close to the base of the Great Pyramid. Having some degree of difficulty in his attempt to get the legs on an equal footing, he dislodged what he assumed was a small piece of limestone, but which closer inspection revealed to be a fragment of plaster, the kind of plaster traditionally used in ancient times to seal up the entrance of a tomb.

With the same archaeological team having already made a series of spectacular discoveries at Giza over the previous 20 years, most notably a large group of superb statues of King Menkaure, builder of Giza’s third pyramid, this new discovery was so unexpected the excavation director George Reisner was still in the US. So the task of opening the tomb fell to his British assistant Alan Rowe and his Egyptian head foreman Said Ahmed Said, whose removal of the plaster covering revealed a 100 foot vertical shaft cut down into the limestone bedrock, filled solid with limestone masonry and yet more plaster. Read more.

Archaeologists studied two thousand years old port infrastructure and a large animal cemetery in Berenice on the Red Sea in Egypt.

"This time during excavations we got lucky. Undoubtedly, this year’s most interesting find is a frame - wooden part of a ship hull from the early Roman period" - told PAP Iwona Zych from the Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Warsaw, who leads the research project in cooperation with Prof. Steven E. Sidebotham of the University of Delaware in the United States.

This is the first fully preserved and documented frame from the hull of the ship from this period in Egypt. The find and the place of its discovery leads researchers to believe that the ship was dismantled and its parts stored in the warehouse in the port bay. Read more.