Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "graffiti"

One of Churchill County’s most prized attractions was recently struck by vandals, according to a press release from the Bureau of Land Management.

The suspects littered Hidden Cave with graffiti and the information kiosk was riddled with bullets, according to the BLM’s press release. Graffiti was also observed on several rocks on the trail leading to the cave.

As a result, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is offering a $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for vandalizing the popular spot, east of Fallon. Read more.

Archaeologists believe that markings scratched into the walls of a Scottish castle could be 700 years old.

A team carrying out preservation work at Mingary Castle, on the Ardnamurchan peninsula, discovered the “graffiti” on plastered walls of the chapel.

Some of the simple markings are thought to represent a ship and the first letter of someone’s name.

The archaeological team believes the markings may date from when the chapel was first built, between 1265 and 1295.

Local historian Jon Haylett, who lives in the nearby village of Kilchoan, said the markings had been found by architectural consultant Tom Addyman and his team. Read more.

The graffiti ‘Ding Jinhao was here’ can be removed without damaging the ancient stone relief, Egyptian officials say

A 15-year-old Chinese tourist has caused an international outcry after a picture of his graffiti on a wall of the ancient Luxor Temple was shared on Chinese social networks.

The message “Ding Jinhao was here” scrawled over a carved scene on the temple wall depicting Alexander the Great was photographed by a group of Chinese tourists, who according to Chinese blogs failed in attempts to remove the marks.

According to AFP, Jinhao was subsequently targeted by Chinese hackers, and his parents issued an apology to Egyptians and to the Chinese, saying that their son had “cried all night.” Read more.

The daily lives of medieval townsfolk have been brought to light by an extraordinary haul of graffiti found in Norwich Cathedral.

Messages have been scratched into the walls of the historic buildings over hundreds of years, but few people have ever stopped to work out what they say.

Archaeologists have now started a major project to decipher the extraordinary messages, and have found a mixture of musical pieces, pious exhortations and even supernatural curses.

While most church-goers these days would never even contemplate defacing the walls of a Norman cathedral with graffiti, medieval residents of Norfolk had a far less protective attitude to their monuments. Read more.

A facelift of the Colosseum in Rome that began last fall has revealed centuries of graffiti. Removing the accumulated grime and calcification, experts discovered layers of inscriptions on the section of a wall seen here—designs in red and faded gray from antiquity, and lettering in black left by visitors in modern times.

Built in the first century, the Colosseum may have held crowds as large as 50,000 people. Its numbered entrances and covered passages were designed to get spectators in and out quickly and to separate the high and mighty from the hoi polloi. 

The wall in this picture flanked a passage that led to an upper tier. There, women, children, and slaves perched in the cheap seats to watch the bloody spectacle of gladiators and wild beasts battling for their lives on the arena floor 60 feet (18 meters) below. Read more.

Think of it as the earliest version of the Facebook wall post: Ancient Pompeii residents revealed their social networks through graffiti on actual walls.

Now, a new analysis of some of these scribbled messages reveals the walls of the wealthy were highly sought after, especially for political candidates hoping to drum up votes. The findings suggest that Pompeii homeowners may have had some control over who got artistic on their walls, said study researcher Eeva-Maria Viitanen, an archaeologist at the University of Helsinki.

"The current view is that any candidate could have chosen any location and have their ad painted on the wall. After looking at the contexts, this would not seem very likely," Viitanen told LiveScience. Read more.

History is often shaped by the stories of kings and religious and military leaders, and much of what we know about the past derives from official sources like military records and governmental decrees. Now an international project is gaining invaluable insights into the history of ancient Israel through the collection and analysis of inscriptions — pieces of common writing that include anything from a single word to a love poem, epitaph, declaration, or question about faith, and everything in between that does not appear in a book or on a coin.

Such writing on the walls — or column, stone, tomb, floor, or mosaic — is essential to a scholar’s toolbox, explains Prof. Jonathan Price of Tel Aviv University's Department of Classics. Along with his colleague Prof. Benjamin Isaac, Prof. Hannah Cotton of Hebrew University and Prof. Werner Eck of the University of Cologne, he is a contributing editor to a series of volumes that presents the written remains of the lives of common individuals in Israel, as well as adding important information about provincial administration and religious institutions, during the period between Alexander the Great and the rise of Islam (the fourth century B.C.E. to the seventh century C.E.). Read more.

CULPEPER With the steady hands of a surgeon, architectural conservator Chris Mills slowly unveils history one painstaking step at a time. His goals are to reveal and protect the Civil War-era signatures, drawings and scribbling found throughout the Brandy Station Graffiti House.

The circa-1858 structure is believed to have been used as a hospital by Confederate and Union forces during the war. For unknown reasons, patrons decided to mark up the walls with signatures, drawings and anything else that crossed their minds. Mills’ challenge is to remove the post-historic paint and whitewash that subsequent owners attempted to cover the markings with, as well as stabilize the fragile plaster.

"You don’t want to mess with the graffiti itself, everything affects it," Mills said of the tedious process. In addition to removing the cover layer with tools such as a razor and an elongated cotton swab, he stabilizes the plaster by injecting a synthetic resin and pinning it till it dries.

The room he is currently working in, coined the J.E.B. Stuart room because of a signature in the room, has posed a unique challenge to Mills because of a colored lime wash applied directly to the plaster in parts of the room. Read more.