Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "iron age"

Life-size human statues and column bases from a long-lost temple dedicated to a supreme god have been discovered in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq.

The discoveries date back over 2,500 years to the Iron Age, a time period when several groups — such as the Urartians, Assyrians and Scythians — vied for supremacy over what is now northern Iraq.

"I didn’t do excavation, just archaeological soundings —the villagers uncovered these materials accidentally," said Dlshad Marf Zamua, a doctoral student at Leiden University in the Netherlands, who began the fieldwork in 2005. Read more.

A search for 2,000 volunteers for an archaeology dig at an Iron Age fort on the outskirts of Cardiff is under way by Cardiff University.

The Caerau hill fort near Ely is thought to have been occupied from the 5th Century BC by the Silurian tribe.

A dig last year involving 1,000 people found its use may have continued into the late Roman era or even later.

The Caerau And Ely Rediscovering Heritage (Caer) Project runs until 25 July.

Organisers say work on the site since 2011 has helped rewrite the history of early Cardiff, revealing an early occupation date for a hill fort with “massive” ramparts. Read more.

This summer, archaeologists are welcoming tourists to explore an ancient British hillfort full of prehistoric artifacts, as the researchers wrap up an excavation at the site.

The fort, called Burrough Hill, was carved into the side of a 690-foot (210 meters) mound in the modern-day English county of Leicestershire during the Iron Age, around 500 B.C., and was used until the third or fourth century A.D. of the Roman period.

A five-year excavation of the site yielded bones, jewelry, pottery and even game pieces. Archaeologists will open the hillfort to visitors on June 29, hosting guided tours that allow people to touch some of the artifacts, and offering Iron Age combat lessons before the dig comes to a close at the end of the summer. Read more.

A day of digging undertaken by three expert archaeologists has unearthed over sixty objects from a one-metre square excavation at Land’s End, after the site was uncovered by digging rabbits.

In February, the wild rabbits at Land’s End accidentally uncovered a collection of flint scrapers and arrowheads while burrowing their warrens.

The discovery prompted Land’s End to commission a thorough archaeological investigation of their land and now the finds discovered and compiled by Big Heritage UK have revealed evidence of an iron-age hill fort, a bronze-age barrow cemetery and a Neolithic passage grave. Read more.

Archaeologists have identified what could be remains of the earliest false tooth found in Western Europe.

The dental implant comes from the richly-furnished timber burial chamber of an Iron Age woman that was excavated in Le Chene, northern France.

The woman, who was between 20 and 30 years old when she died, had an iron pin in place of an upper incisor tooth.

It is possible the pin once held a false tooth made from either wood or bone, which could have rotted away. Read more.

A small Iron Age settlement has been found during excavations at the site of a new housing development near Swindon.

A number of “round houses” with hundreds of pits for storage are among the discoveries at Ridgeway Farm, where Taylor Wimpey is building 700 homes.

Other items found include loom weights for weaving, quern stones for grinding corn and various personal items.

Andrew Manning from Wessex Archaeology, which is carrying out the work, said the find was of local significance. Read more.

Scientists and archaeologists at the University of Manchester have uncovered evidence that our ancestors carried out ritual human sacrifice … in Salford.

The discovery, captured on camera for an upcoming Channel 5 documentary, was made during a ground-breaking CT scan of the 1,900-year-old remains of ‘Worsley Man’ - whose head was found in a Salford peat bog in 1958.

Worsley Man, now kept at Manchester Museum but thought to have lived around 100 AD when Romans occupied Britain, has been X-rayed before - but never with such an advanced scanner. Read more.

An Iron Age village plus a host of ancient artefacts including tools and jewellery have been discovered on a construction site.

The finds were made by teams working on the £17 million A75 Dunragit bypass in Wigtownshire.

Tools, arrowheads, urns and bead necklaces from the Mesolithic (9000 BC to 4500 BC), Neolithic (4500 BC to 2000 BC), Bronze (2500 BC to 800 BC) and Iron Ages (800 BC to 500 AD) were found, along with the Iron Age village and a Bronze Age cemetery.

A 130-piece jet bead necklace was of particular interest to archaeologists, who were able to trace its origin in Whitby, North Yorkshire, around 155 miles from where it was found. Read more.