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Posts tagged "iron age"

IN 1958, archaeologist Robert Dyson was excavating the long-buried citadel of Hasanlu in Iran when he came across this beautiful gold bowl (pictured). But after a moment in the international headlines, the bowl and citadel were largely forgotten.

And so the unique circumstances under which the precious vessel fell to the bottom of a refuse shaft 2,800 years ago are only now coming to light, as Dyson’s former student Michael Danti of Boston University revisits the excavation notes.

Today, Hasanlu looks like a large dirt mound that rises 25 metres out of the Solduz valley in north-west Iran, but beneath the earth are the remains of a settlement that was occupied nearly continuously for millennia, from 6000 BC. Read more.

Archaeologists digging at an Iron Age settlement are keeping the location a secret in a bid to stop people with metal detectors spoiling the site.

The settlement in Guernsey dates back 2,000 years and it is thought mostly pottery will be found.

Archaeologist Dr Phil de Jersey said keeping it a secret gave them a “head start”.

He added there had been a “growing problem” with people using metal detectors on land without permission.

The dig is expected to last up to three weeks.

Dr de Jersey said: “I wanted to be a bit cautious at the start. Read more.

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Archaeologists hoping to discover Roman and Iron Age finds at a Welsh hillfort were shocked to unearth pottery and arrowheads predating their predicted finds by 4,000 years at the home of a powerful Iron Age community, including flint tools and weapons from 3,600 BC.

Caerau, an Iron Age residency on the outskirts of Cardiff, would have been a battleground more than 5,000 years ago according to the arrowheads, awls, scrapers and polished stone axe fragments found during the surprising excavation.

“Quite frankly, we were amazed,” says Dr Dave Wyatt, the co-director of the dig, from Cardiff University.

“Nobody predicted this. Our previous excavation [in 2013] yielded pottery and a mass of finds, including five large roundhouses, showing Iron Age occupation, and there’s evidence of Roman and medieval activity. Read more.

IMPORTANT finds dating back to the Iron Age and Roman period have been uncovered at the site of a new bypass to be built as part of the Hinkley C project.

Archaeologists working at the site of the Cannington bypass revealed their discoveries to local residents on Thursday when EDF Energy and Somerset County Council invited local stakeholders to take a look.

The dig is being carried out at the site of a planned Cannington bypass which will be built to help serve the proposed Hinkley Point C nuclear power station.

Experts from the dig team were on hand to guide residents through the finds, which included remains of a substantial stone building dating from Roman times with underfloor heating and traces of painted wall plaster. Read more.

An Iron Age hearth and evidence of a Bronze Age settlement have been uncovered in Porthleven by builders working on a new housing development.

Archaeologists have been working alongside the contractors developing land off Shrubberies Hill and have been excited by the find.

Community archaeologist Richard Mikulski said of the Iron Age hearth: “It’s quite a big deal. It’s the first ever find in Cornwall and there’s only one other example that we know of that’s sort of similar found in the south west, if not the country, found at Glastonbury at the end of the 19th century. Read more.

Life-size human statues and column bases from a long-lost temple dedicated to a supreme god have been discovered in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq.

The discoveries date back over 2,500 years to the Iron Age, a time period when several groups — such as the Urartians, Assyrians and Scythians — vied for supremacy over what is now northern Iraq.

"I didn’t do excavation, just archaeological soundings —the villagers uncovered these materials accidentally," said Dlshad Marf Zamua, a doctoral student at Leiden University in the Netherlands, who began the fieldwork in 2005. Read more.

A search for 2,000 volunteers for an archaeology dig at an Iron Age fort on the outskirts of Cardiff is under way by Cardiff University.

The Caerau hill fort near Ely is thought to have been occupied from the 5th Century BC by the Silurian tribe.

A dig last year involving 1,000 people found its use may have continued into the late Roman era or even later.

The Caerau And Ely Rediscovering Heritage (Caer) Project runs until 25 July.

Organisers say work on the site since 2011 has helped rewrite the history of early Cardiff, revealing an early occupation date for a hill fort with “massive” ramparts. Read more.

This summer, archaeologists are welcoming tourists to explore an ancient British hillfort full of prehistoric artifacts, as the researchers wrap up an excavation at the site.

The fort, called Burrough Hill, was carved into the side of a 690-foot (210 meters) mound in the modern-day English county of Leicestershire during the Iron Age, around 500 B.C., and was used until the third or fourth century A.D. of the Roman period.

A five-year excavation of the site yielded bones, jewelry, pottery and even game pieces. Archaeologists will open the hillfort to visitors on June 29, hosting guided tours that allow people to touch some of the artifacts, and offering Iron Age combat lessons before the dig comes to a close at the end of the summer. Read more.