Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "maui"

NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries’ Maritime Heritage Program and the University of Hawaii’s Marine Option Program have completed a survey of sunken World War II-era aircraft and shipwrecks along Maui’s southern coast. The two-week survey continues a longstanding collaboration between NOAA and the University of Hawaii in providing students with hands-on training in maritime archaeology surveying techniques.

The survey team produced scaled drawings and took photographs of six wreck sites, including a carrier-based dive bomber (SB2C-1C Helldiver); a carrier-based fighter plane (F6F Hellcat); and three amphibious assault vehicles (LVT-4 and LVTA-4s), two with mounted with 75mm howitzers. The documentation is used to evaluate wrecks for deterioration and helps identify when artifacts have been moved or go missing. Read more.

More than a decade after it was set aside for preservation, a 20-acre site at Palauea could be transformed into a “living classroom” on Hawaiian culture, archaeology and agriculture under a proposal by the University of Hawaii Maui College.

Archaeologists believe the parcel was once part of a major South Maui Hawaiian settlement that contained an important water source, a heiau complex and other ancient sites. The site was designated a cultural preserve as a condition of the 2000 special management area and project district approvals for the One Palauea Bay subdivision, and the developers have long proposed transferring the parcel to the University of Hawaii.

Now UH-MC officials are gathering public comments on a plan to take over the site, in advance of presenting a formal proposal to the UH Board of Regents for approval.

"It’s ancient," said Kiope Raymond, associate professor of Hawaiian Studies at UH-MC. "It was a very thriving community of Hawaiians, and much of that has been obliterated, unfortunately, over time, with the build-outs of the resort developments." Read more.