Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "medieval"

Archaeologists working at the site of Pliska, once the capital of the First Bulgarian Kingdom, have uncovered a luxurious royal baths that they believe date back to the ninth century CE.

The baths are probably the oldest medieval baths found in the country, reports on September 8 said.

The design of the baths was heavily influence by Mediterranean culture. The bathroom was an architectural jewel of stone over an area of 80 square metres.

Under a large dome-covered stone building, there were three separate but luxurious rooms. Read more.

There is a rare chance to view Winchelsea’s most significant medieval cellar at the weekend.

The National Trust will be opening the cellar under the ruins of what is called ‘Blackfriars Barn’ on Saturday September 13.

The cellar has what is claimed to be one of the rarest examples of medieval graffiti in the country.

It is opening as part of the national Heritage Open Day scheme.

Winchelsea Archaeological Society will be conducting tours of both the ruins and the cellar at 11am and 2pm.

The cellar is reckoned the finest of Winchelsea 51 vaulted medieval cellars. Read more.

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YORK.- A prominent Japanese academic has donated fragments of Latin medieval manuscripts and seven fragments of early printed books to the University of York.

Each fragment consists of one or two leaves (pages) from a medieval manuscript or early printed book, of dates ranging from the 10th to the 16th centuries. Many include coloured or gold-leaf decorated initials.

Professor Toshiyuki Takamiya, of Keio University in Tokyo, presented the box of fragments to Linne Mooney, Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies and Professor of Medieval English Palaeography in the Department of English and Related Literature at York. Read more.

While conducting an excavation near Brest in northwestern France, before the construction of a road, a number of finds were uncovered including a rare early 14th century hoard that speaks of the turbulent times of the Hundred Years Wars.

The archaeologists from INRAP (the French archaeological agency), located a craft area with work spaces and a series of buildings of the 12th-14th centuries that covered 7000 square metres. It was one of these buildings that delivered the unexpected monetary deposit of nearly 130 French and English coins from the early fourteenth century.

Archaeologists unearthed the remains of masonry along the route corresponding to three buildings dated to between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries. Read more.

A medieval barley malting oven dating back to the 13th Century has been discovered by archaeologists excavating a site where an office block is to be built in Northampton.

The dig in Bridge street is the first large-scale excavation in the town for 30 years.

The kiln is almost perfectly preserved with charring marks on the hearth.

Evidence from the site, near where Northampton Castle stood, indicates it was a thriving commercial area.

Archaeologist Paul Blinkhorn said it was a rare find in an area where there was evidence of medieval industry. Read more.

A St Mary’s underwater explorer believes he’s uncovered two wrecks, one of which could date back to the 14th century and the other from around 400 year later.

Todd Stevens has 30 years experience in the field and has located 15 wrecks so far.

He’s brought “large lumps” of medieval pottery fragments to the surface following his seabed surveying near Nut Rock. Todd says the pottery is clearly from that period with its crude pattern and formation. He’s also found parts of a rudder, chains, mast hoops and an anchor.

The site is near to the only known medieval shipwreck incident recorded in Scilly from 1305.

But there’s also some later 18th century pottery, which Todd believes is European redware, and is very different to the medieval ceramics. Read more.

Remnants of the late medieval church have been discovered in the range Piszczewo near Suraż by a team of archaeologists from the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology PAS in Warsaw.

"During this year’s work we were able to discover yet another unknown card in the history of one of the oldest towns in Podlasie. On a small hill on the river Narew, we syrveyed the remains of a sixteenth-century church" - reported Dariusz Krasnodębski of the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology PAS.

Archaeologists conducted excavations at the site based on inconclusive information derived from written sources and oral reports from the 1930s. Read more.

A SEAL used to decorate wax as it secured medieval letters has been discovered in the first week of an archaeological dig.

The artefact - thought to have been used between AD 1250 and 1400 - was discovered buried in a field off Thorne Lane as part of an excavation led by Dr James Gerrard, a lecturer in Roman archaeology at Newcastle University.

The inscription reads SOhOV ROBEN and the picture shows a hare riding a hound and blowing a hunting horn.

Mr Gerrard, formerly of Yeovil, said: “This is an exciting discovery and an example of medieval humour or wit. “Sohov is an Anglicised French hunting call like ‘tally-ho’ and Roben is a typical French name for a dog during the period - like Fido or Rover. Read more.