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Posts tagged "norfolk"

The distinctive Bronze Age landmark at Fiddler’s Hill has been transferred to the ownership of the Norfolk Archaeological Trust (NAT) for a token value of £1.

The agreement will mean improvements to public access and historic interpretations at the 4,000-year-old site, which lies next to a crossroads on Binham Road, between Binham and Warham.

Prehistoric human remains, burnt flints and evidence of possible cremations have previously been recorded at the mound, but the focus will be on preservation rather than excavation.

The NAT has assumed responsibility for keeping the site clear of scrub and putting up public information boards, for which funding has been agreed by English Heritage. Read more.

A recently discovered mysterious “winged” structure in England, which in the Roman period may have been used as a temple, presents a puzzle for archaeologists, who say the building has no known parallels.

Built around 1,800 years ago, the structure was discovered in Norfolk, in eastern England, just to the south of the ancient town of Venta Icenorum. The structure has two wings radiating out from a rectangular room that in turn leads to a central room.

"Generally speaking, [during] the Roman Empire people built within a fixed repertoire of architectural forms," said William Bowden, a professor at the University of Nottingham, who reported the find in the most recent edition of the Journal of Roman Archaeology. The investigation was carried out in conjunction with the Norfolk Archaeological and Historical Research Group. Read more.

Gavin Bowen and Gary Barker found the 11 coins, dating back to 1553, while using their detectors in Spixworth.

A treasure trove inquest was conducted this week by Norfolk Coroner William Armstrong, who read from a report by Dr Adrian Marsden, of the British Museum.

Mr Armstrong said: “The coins were found while searching with metal detectors in the months up to September 2009.

“At this point it was realised that the coins could have been a case of treasure.”

He added that the coins were believed to be a group, originally held in a purse or container, “which were lost over time and scattered as a result of farming activity”.

The find was defined as treasure, meaning it belongs to the Crown. The discovery is one of many in the region, which has seen a record number of archaeological finds recently.

At the inquest, Mr Armstrong also oversaw two other finds classified as treasure. Part of an ancient horse harness dating back to 1BC was discovered this April in Shipdam, near East Dereham, as a result of metal detecting on the part of Stephen Ottaway. Read more.

NORFOLK — In the late 1700s, the heart of Colonial Kempsville was what is now the intersection of Princess Anne, Kempsville and Witchduck roads.

Back then, Kempsville was referred to as Kempe’s Landing and was a thriving river port town bustling with trade along the eastern branch of the Elizabeth River. That expansive waterway — now a much smaller creek — was the site of a recent archaeological dig conducted by area archaeologists including Nick Luccketti.

A few weeks ago, Luccketti spent a week digging up three areas located within the Historic Kempsville District hoping to find artifacts hinting at the former Colonial river port’s early days. Read more.

Archaeologists have spent the last two summers at the site of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund, with Channel 4’s Time Team filming them for a TV special last year.

The archaeologists returned at the weekend for another three week of digging, this time excavating parts of the Roman forum.

Led by Dr Will Bowden, associate professor of Roman archaeology at the University of Nottingham, the team hope to find out when the forum was built and what happened to it in the later Roman period.

Parts of the site were originally excavated between 1929 and 1935 following the publication of dramatic aerial photographs showing evidence of streets and public buildings, which made national newspaper headlines.

Those who studied the site in 1929-35, thought the Roman forum had been destroyed by fire and lay in ruins for around a hundred years before it was rebuilt.

The team carrying out the new excavations are looking for evidence of that blaze and are also digging in the north west of the town. Read more.

A Viking carved dragon head, Saxon brooch and Roman coins have all been found at the site of a new hospice in West Norfolk.

Archaeologists have unearthed a range of fascinating artefacts from across the ages as preparation work began for the Norfolk Hospice Tapping House at Hillington, near King’s Lynn.

The carving of the dragon head, about an inch long, is believed to date from the Viking era while the bronze brooch dates to the Middle Saxon period.

“We have a watching brief on the site while the groundwork is being done and have found a number of really interesting artefacts,” said David Whitmore, manager for the Norfolk Archaeological Unit (NAU). Read more.

Archaeologists have uncovered a wealth of interesting artifacts after excavating at a Norfolk pub.

The finds were discovered during a dig at the Mermaid Inn at Hedenham, near Bungay, on Sunday.

The dig took place at a Summer Fayre put on to raise money for sufferers of cancer.

Carenza Lewis, of Channel 4’s Time Team, led the digs and explained how excited she was as it was the first time she had excavated in the area she grew up in.

“We’ve never dug here before and we had no idea what we would find,” Dr Lewis explained.

“It’s the closest I’ve ever done to digging to my childhood home and it’s lovely also to be part of a community raising money for Macmillan.”

The team found a Victorian pipe, evidence of a pre-historic settlement dating from over 3000 years ago, items from either the Bronze or Iron Age, Medieval pottery and cooking implements from the time of the Norman conquest. Read more.

Human remains thought to be nearly 2,000 years old have been unearthed at a building site in Norfolk.

he man’s body, found crouched in a burial pit, could date back to Roman times and is the latest in a string of fascinating discoveries to be made at the former RAF Watton base.

Experts working at the site have previously uncovered six Bronze Age axes while a Bronze Age round barrow with a cremation urn and five other cremation burials were found at the end of 2010.

Analysis of the skeleton has so far revealed the man had been suffering from osteoarthritis in his spine and further tests are now under way to find out more about his origins.

A single shard of pottery was also found within the grave, suggesting that the burial dates from AD43 to AD410. Read more.