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Posts tagged "pamirs plateau"

Chinese archaeologists have started excavating a cluster of 2500-year-old tombs on the Pamirs Plateau that imply Sun worshipping.

The tombs were found in Xinjiang’s Taxkorgan Tajik Autonomous county, a border region neighboring Afghanistan and Pakistan, in 2007, and the arrangement is a new mystery on the crossroads of the ancient Silk Road.

Eights tombs, each two meters in diameter, were arranged on a 100-meter-long and 50-meter-wide platform, with lines of black stones and lines of white stones stretching alongside like Sun rays, according to the archaeology team with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Read more.

A 1,300-year-old unidentified cluster of 102 tombs, 40 percent of which were made for infants, have been unearthed in China’s restive westernmost province.

The tombs, found on the Pamirs Plateau in Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, contain wooden caskets with desiccated corpses, as well as stoneware, pottery and copper ware believed to have been buried as sacrificial items, said Ai Tao from the Xinjiang Archaeological Institute.

"The cluster covers an area of 1,500 square meters on a 20-meter-high cliff, an unusual location for tombs," Ai told state-run Xinhua news agency.

He added that his team was also very surprised to find such a large number of infant corpses. Read more.

TAXKORGAN, Xinjiang, (Xinhua) — Chinese archaeologists have discovered an unidentified cluster of tombs on the Pamirs Plateau, unveiling a new mystery on the crossroads of the ancient Silk Road.

Eights tombs, each two meters in diameter, were arranged on a 100-meter-long and 50-meter-wide terrace, with lines of black stones and lines of white stones stretching alongside like rays, according to the archaeology team with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences that found the tombs in Xinjiang’s Taxkorgan Tajik Autonomous County, a border region neighboring Afghanistan and Pakistan, in October.

"The tombs are peculiar. No similar ones had been detected before on the Pamirs Plateau, or even in all of Central Asia," team captain Wu Xinhua said, adding that the discovery shows a gap between their knowledge and studies, and previous findings along the Silk Road. Read more.