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Posts tagged "pottery"

BLOOMFIELD, N.M. (AP) — Workers widening a northwestern New Mexico highway bordering an archaeological site found artifacts that officials said might be from the ancient Puebloan culture.

The pottery pieces and fragments of charcoal, burned corn fibers and other material were found last week when a laborer noticed something red and black glinting in the sun, the Daily Times reported Sunday.

The Mountain States Constructors Inc. crew was widening U.S. Highway 64 along the Salmon Ruins in Bloomfield when workers made the find.

Hector Beyale reported the discovery to a supervisor who alerted Salmon Ruins Executive Director Larry Baker. Read more.

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An enigmatic box from a bygone era, filled with pottery, seeds and animal bones, has been discovered in the University of Bristol’s Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. The box was found while researchers were emptying current laboratory spaces in preparation for the installation of a new state-of-the-art radiocarbon dating facility.

Index cards nestled amongst the objects in the box provided a clue to the origins of the material. Key words such as ‘Predynastic’, ‘Sargonid’, and ‘Royal Tombs’ suggested the remains came from the famous excavations by Sir Leonard Woolley in southern Iraq at the site of Ur during the 1920s and early 1930s.

The discovery is very exciting because environmental finds were rarely collected in this early period of archaeological fieldwork, especially from this part of the world. Read more.

4,000-year-old pottery from the early Bronze Age, the remains of timber roundhouses and evidence of Iron Age smithing are among the discoveries made by archaeologists investigating a proposed park and ride site near Aberdeen.

The Archaeological dig undertaken by AECOM and Headland Archaeology ahead of construction work on the “Park and Choose” site, which is being developed as part of new link road, took place on a “relatively undisturbed” site where archaeological discoveries have been made in the past.

Their finds suggest agricultural, industrial and domestic activity, and show that the site was used from the early Bronze Age (2300BC) right through to the 1800s. Read more.

Tough and tiny zircon crystals have helped researchers rule out an enormous volcanic blast as the source of ash used to make Maya pottery, deepening this long-running archaeological mystery.

"While we’re a little sad not to have solved the mystery, we’re really confident we can say the most likely source quite conclusively isn’t a match," said lead author Kevin Coffey, a geology master’s student at the University of California, Los Angeles.

However, the results did a reveal a tantalizing new pottery puzzle for scientists to solve — whether the Maya’s ash came from one volcano or many spewing cones. Read more.

ITEMS of pottery dating from medieval times have been discovered during an archaeological dig at a woodland park.

The Friends of Fairy Dell, a group of volunteers which runs the park, in Coulby Newham, Middlesbrough, discovered a “trod”, or path, believed to date from the medieval period.

The group was awarded £38,800 from the Heritage Lottery Fund, match funded by equipment from Middlesbrough Council, towards the dig and a “Pathways to the Past” project.

For the past week volunteers and schools have helped Tees Archaeology dig down through the different layers of the path, which it is believed may have connected the deserted medieval village at Newham with the old Gunnergate Lane. It runs between Fairy Dell park and the Dell. Read more.

Ethnic people in a Quang Nam Province commune discovered a trove of ancient relics they later threw away or gave to children as toys.

The Co Tu minority people were digging the foundation of a new home in a resettlement area in Nam Giang District’s Ta Binh ward when they struck a trove of pottery pieces, vases, strings and pots buried under the ground.

Most of the relics were thrown away, some agate beads given to children as toys.

A group of archaeologists from the Sa Huynh Culture Museum recently spent hours excavating the site, unearthing relics they believe belonged to the Sa Huynh civilization. Read more.

German and Dutch pots, jugs and mugs, coins including an American cent, spindles, a sheep skull and horse teeth have been found by archaeologists digging in the Scottish Borders, where doors integrated into walls have revealed a “lost” Medieval village of families, farmyards and hearths.

Between Edinburgh and the Northumberland National Park, the outskirts of Selkirk have previously been associated with the Battle of Philiphaugh, a 1645 victory for the Scottish Covenanter Army against their under-strength Royalist enemies.

A pipeline-laying project by Scottish Water, though, has found stone brick structures including two pivot stones, used as hinges for doors between the 14th and 16th centuries but turned into cobbling after their buildings were demolished. Read more.

The Israel Antiquities Authority announced on Wednesday the staggering find of a large number of ancient pottery pieces, fully intact and safely stored…in a basement.

It all began with a phone call to the IAA: “In my basement there are full boxes of ancient vases and pottery, that a member of my family, a fisherman, left before he died…” said Osnat Lester, a resident of Galilee town Poriya Illit.

"I want to pass the pottery on to the state, and I want my grandchildren to know where to see them in the future," explained Lester. Read more.