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Posts tagged "pottery"

An archaeological dig has unearthed what could be a Roman settlement.

Roman pottery and a red deer antler have been found at the dig in a field near St Rumbold’s Well, in Buckingham, a county councillor told the Advertiser.

After the excavating digger also uncovered a long stretch of wall beneath the field’s surface, county councillor Robin Stuchbury informed Bucks County Council’s archaeological planning officer, Eliza Alqassar, who visited the site on Wednesday.

Mr Stuchbury said the wall is almost 80m long and could be Roman. Read more.

SHARDS of antique pottery dating back to the 1800s have been uncovered in Portobello.

Archaeologists discovered the bright yellow glazed pieces – believed to be in the shape of a dog – in a rubbish dump excavated on the Promenade.

The seaside resort was home to a thriving ceramics industry for more than 200 years, but the last pottery closed its doors in the 1970s.

Initial examinations by a ceramics expert from the Portobello Heritage Trust found that the shards dated back to the early 19th century, revealed chairwoman Dr Margaret Munro. Read more.

Fragments of Roman pottery and food waste from the 18th century have been uncovered during work to replace Lancaster’s sewer system.

Engineers working for United Utilities had to tread carefully when working at the Damside Street site, as the area was subject to archaeological monitoring, due to the now culverted Lancaster mill race running through the site.

Enormous sewer pipes and underground storage tanks the size of Olympic swimming pools have now been carved out deep underground, in one of the biggest engineering schemes Lancaster has seen. The £18m project will enhance the city’s sewer system, in order to reduce river pollution. Read more.

Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Corinth, Greece, have discovered a tomb dating back around 2,800 years that has pottery decorated with zigzagging designs.

The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea.

The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. Read more.

AN archaeological dig in Anstey has revealed new clues about the village’s past.

Test pits dug around Anstey revealed the foundations of demolished cottages from two different periods, animal bones, and Roman pottery.

The items spanned two thousand years of the village’s history, the majority from the 11th or 12th century onwards.

Some test pits also contained fragments of flint from early tool making.

The dig was part of the Charnwood Roots project, which is exploring how people lived, worked and enjoyed the Charnwood area across the centuries. Read more.

A St Mary’s underwater explorer believes he’s uncovered two wrecks, one of which could date back to the 14th century and the other from around 400 year later.

Todd Stevens has 30 years experience in the field and has located 15 wrecks so far.

He’s brought “large lumps” of medieval pottery fragments to the surface following his seabed surveying near Nut Rock. Todd says the pottery is clearly from that period with its crude pattern and formation. He’s also found parts of a rudder, chains, mast hoops and an anchor.

The site is near to the only known medieval shipwreck incident recorded in Scilly from 1305.

But there’s also some later 18th century pottery, which Todd believes is European redware, and is very different to the medieval ceramics. Read more.

BLOOMFIELD, N.M. (AP) — Workers widening a northwestern New Mexico highway bordering an archaeological site found artifacts that officials said might be from the ancient Puebloan culture.

The pottery pieces and fragments of charcoal, burned corn fibers and other material were found last week when a laborer noticed something red and black glinting in the sun, the Daily Times reported Sunday.

The Mountain States Constructors Inc. crew was widening U.S. Highway 64 along the Salmon Ruins in Bloomfield when workers made the find.

Hector Beyale reported the discovery to a supervisor who alerted Salmon Ruins Executive Director Larry Baker. Read more.

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An enigmatic box from a bygone era, filled with pottery, seeds and animal bones, has been discovered in the University of Bristol’s Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. The box was found while researchers were emptying current laboratory spaces in preparation for the installation of a new state-of-the-art radiocarbon dating facility.

Index cards nestled amongst the objects in the box provided a clue to the origins of the material. Key words such as ‘Predynastic’, ‘Sargonid’, and ‘Royal Tombs’ suggested the remains came from the famous excavations by Sir Leonard Woolley in southern Iraq at the site of Ur during the 1920s and early 1930s.

The discovery is very exciting because environmental finds were rarely collected in this early period of archaeological fieldwork, especially from this part of the world. Read more.