Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "rock art"

Central Kimberley rock art from the period of first Aboriginal–European contact shows iconography dramatically different to both pre-contact art and contact art from other districts.

Archaeologist Jane Balme says this reflects the violent history of the time and place, where Jandamarra led a guerrilla action against settlers and police, and Aborigines were then obliged to work on pastoral stations.

Contact period rock art is mostly confined to charcoal drawings and images lightly scratched in the rockface.

Some traditional owner’s recall seeing these made when they were children visiting these sites with their parents. Read more.

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah archaeologists are incensed and a federal agency is pursuing a criminal case involving the brazen, daylight defacement of one of the state’s most prominent rock art panels.

Someone etched their initials and the date next to the prehistoric image known as the “Pregnant Buffalo” on a rock panel in Nine Mile Canyon just minutes after it had been inspected by archaeologist Jerry D. Spangler.

“Each act of vandalism is a selfish disregard of the aesthetic, spiritual and scientific values that constitute our collective past,” said Spangler, executive director of the Colorado Plateau Archaeological Alliance. Read more.

Rock art in Western Australia’s Pilbara region believed to be up to 60,000 years old has been attacked by vandals.

Tourist guide and Ngarluma man Clinton Walker said he had discovered a defaced piece of rock art on the Burrup Peninsula in Murujuga National Park.

"Someone has actually etched into a rock right above where some of the rock art is and wrote: ‘go and work for a living’," he said.

The Burrup Peninsula is home to the world’s biggest collection of Aboriginal rock art and gained national heritage listing in 2007.

Greens MP Robin Chapple said he was shocked and disappointed to learn of the fresh vandalism reports. Read more.

A 5,000 year-old rock painting in southern Spain has been destroyed by thieves who tried to steal the Unesco World Heritage-listed artwork by chipping it off the cave wall where it was housed.

Residents of the Santa Elena in Spain’s southern Jaén province are reeling after news of the damage.

Local mayor Juan Caminero said the painting was now “irreparable” and condemned the act of vandalism as “heartless”, Spanish daily La Vanguardia reported on Monday.

News of the attempted theft first emerged on Saturday after visitors to the Los Escolares Cave noticed the damage to the zoomorphic painting of a person resembling a swallow.

After noticing what looked like evidence of someone having tried to chip away at the image with a pick, they spotted fine dust and rock fragments on the floor. Read more.

An interdisciplinary team has used a new technique known as plasma oxidation to produce radiocarbon dates for paint fragments as small as 10 micrograms in width.

Archaeologist and UWA Winthrop Professor Jo McDonald, says her team spent three years documenting rock art sites along the Canning Stock Route, in the eastern Pilbara, at the request of traditional owners.

"A lot of them had had not been visited for a very long time," she says.

"The community hasn’t lived on country since the 1960s – but we had a couple of traditional owners with us who had walked through those areas in the 70s." Read more.

Rare, prehistoric rock art which could be more than 4,000 years old has been discovered in the Brecon Beacons.

The Bronze Age discovery was made late last year by national park geologist Alan Bowring.

Experts claim the stone probably served as a way marker for farming communities.

Similar stones have been found in other parts of Britain but they are thought to be rare in mid Wales.

Its exact location in the Brecon Beacons is being kept a secret and news of its discovery comes after archaeologists found a similar ancient rock in the Scottish Highlands. Read more.

A rare example of prehistoric rock art has been uncovered in the Highlands.

Archaeologists made the discovery while moving a boulder decorated with ancient cup and ring marks to a new location in Ross-shire.

When they turned the stone over they found the same impressions on the other side of the rock. It is one of only a few decorated stones of its kind.

John Wombell, of North of Scotland Archaeological Society (NOSAS), said: “This is an amazing discovery.”

Susan Kruse, of Archaeology for Communities in the Highlands (ARCH), first discovered the stone at Heights of Fodderty several years ago when out walking. Read more.

Two pre-historic rock art sites in Wayanad district are facing neglect and ruin.

The petroglyphs (rock engravings) on the walls of a slanted rock on the Thovarimala hills, near Sulthan Bathery, and a newly discovered art site at Kappikunnu, near Pulpally, both believed to date back to the Neolithic period, are in urgent need of attention.

Though the rock engravings at Edakkal caves had been protected by government agencies, the ones at Thovarimala, just five km from Edakkal, and Kappikunnu are yet to be taken care of by the Department of Archaeology. Miscreants and anti-socials who reportedly frequent the Thovarimala had disfigured some of the precious carvings by wanton etching. More than 50 motifs had been engraved on the rock walls and many of these resemble the rock carvings of Edakkal. Read more.