Archaeological News

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A 2,000-year-old kitchen, which dates back to the late Roman era, has been discovered in the ancient city of Sagalassos in the southern province of Burdur.

Excavations in the ancient city started in early June, but the discovery of the kitchen was only reported last month.

“The kitchen was completely unearthed. We will learn in great detail about the kitchen culture present in that era. This is a very detailed scientific work. Not only archaeologists, but also anthropologists, zoologists and botanists are working together [on this project],” said Professor Jereon Poblome, head of excavations.

“There are no tiles on the ground, only soil. The understanding of hygiene was different in the late Roman era. Ergonomically, it is a difficult kitchen for us [to use], but they became used to it. They use to put coal in the middle and a pot on it with bulgur and meat inside. Read more.

Fragments of Roman pottery and food waste from the 18th century have been uncovered during work to replace Lancaster’s sewer system.

Engineers working for United Utilities had to tread carefully when working at the Damside Street site, as the area was subject to archaeological monitoring, due to the now culverted Lancaster mill race running through the site.

Enormous sewer pipes and underground storage tanks the size of Olympic swimming pools have now been carved out deep underground, in one of the biggest engineering schemes Lancaster has seen. The £18m project will enhance the city’s sewer system, in order to reduce river pollution. Read more.

AN archaeological dig in Anstey has revealed new clues about the village’s past.

Test pits dug around Anstey revealed the foundations of demolished cottages from two different periods, animal bones, and Roman pottery.

The items spanned two thousand years of the village’s history, the majority from the 11th or 12th century onwards.

Some test pits also contained fragments of flint from early tool making.

The dig was part of the Charnwood Roots project, which is exploring how people lived, worked and enjoyed the Charnwood area across the centuries. Read more.

HISTORIANS today called for an investigation after links to Wearside’s ancient past were unearthed on a building site.

Fragments of 2,000-year-old Roman pottery have been recovered during “deeper excavation works” on the site of the new £11.8million city square.

Council bosses have pledged to produce a report on the finds – to be archived at The Great North Museum in Newcastle – once the work on the project is completed.

But local historians are calling for an in-depth archaeological survey of the area to be carried out now – to prevent Wearside’s possible links to Roman times being buried. Read more.

He looks almost Byzantine or Greek, gazing doe-eyed over the viewer’s left shoulder, his mouth forming a slight pout, like a star-struck lover or perhaps a fan of the races witnessing his favorite charioteer losing control of his horses.

In reality, he’s the “Bearded Man, 170-180 A.D.,” a Roman-Egyptian whose portrait adorned the sarcophagus sheltering his mummified remains. But the details of who he was and what he was thinking have been lost to time.

But perhaps not for much longer. A microscopic sliver of painted wood could hold the keys to unraveling the first part of this centuries-old mystery. Figuring out what kind of pigment was used (whether it was a natural matter or a synthetic pigment mixed to custom specifications), and the exact materials used to create it, could help scientists unlock his identity. Read more.

In Gonio, south of Batumi, a team of researchers has discovered baths built and used by the Roman army about 2000 years ago. “We were surprised by both the age of the structure, as well as its buid quality” - told PAP Dr. Radosław Karasiewicz-Szczypiorski, head of the excavation.

Research is conducted inside the ancient fort Apsaros built by the Romans in the 2nd half of the 1st century AD. Near the fortress ran once the only convenient road from Colchis (Western Georgia) to the Roman provinces in Asia Minor.

"In general, thermal baths built for the military were not luxurious. That is why we were surprised by the discovery of mosaics ornamenting the floor. Read more.

IMPORTANT finds dating back to the Iron Age and Roman period have been uncovered at the site of a new bypass to be built as part of the Hinkley C project.

Archaeologists working at the site of the Cannington bypass revealed their discoveries to local residents on Thursday when EDF Energy and Somerset County Council invited local stakeholders to take a look.

The dig is being carried out at the site of a planned Cannington bypass which will be built to help serve the proposed Hinkley Point C nuclear power station.

Experts from the dig team were on hand to guide residents through the finds, which included remains of a substantial stone building dating from Roman times with underfloor heating and traces of painted wall plaster. Read more.

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Ancient walls dating back to the 2nd-4th century were found during the reconstruction of Sofia’s landmark Lavov Most (Lion’s Bridge) on Thursday.

Excavations were scheduled in the area to coincide with the repair works after one of them was found while the second line of the Sofia Metro was being built a few years ago.

Combined with the two fresh discoveries, however, it gives experts ground to believe they have come across Roman walls that were part of an engineering facility that was connected to placing a bridge over the Perlovska river, Aleksandar Stanev, who leads the excavations, told Darik Radio. (source)