Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "settlement"

An ancient settlement of the South Caucasus, referring to the Neolithic period, was discovered in Azerbaijani Tovuz region, Turkel TV regional channel reported Aug. 30.

The settlement, discovered during excavations in the Haji Alemkhanli village, dates from the end of the seventh millennium BC. The excavations are conducted by Azerbaijani and Japanese archaeologists.

The radiocarbon analysis of the found samples of the material culture of the Neolithic period show that the oldest settlement in the region was in this area. Read more.

ZHENGZHOU, Aug. 27 — Archaeologists in central China’s Henan Province have excavated a large neolithic settlement complete with moats and a cemetery.

The Shanggangyang Site covers an area of 120,000 square meters and sits along a river in Zhengzhou, capital of Henan, dating 5,000 to 6,000 years back to the Yangshao culture, which was widely known for its advanced pottery-making technology.

The site features two defensive moats surrounding three sides. Researchers have found relics of three large houses as well as 39 tombs, the large number suggesting several generations resided there, archaeologist Gao Zanling, a member of the Zhengzhou Administration of Cultural Heritage, said. Read more.

Archaeologists have discovered an ancient settlement on the bank of the Ishim River in Akmola oblast, Tengrinews reports citing the Oblast Department of Culture.

The settlement of Kursk is located on the right bank and covers the area of 45 thousand square meters. It dates back to the Middle Ages.

The archeological expedition was held by the Center for Preservation and Use of Historical and Cultural Heritage under the aegis of the Akmola Oblast Department of Culture. They were making archaeological exploration works in the north-eastern and south-eastern parts of Yesil District in Akmola Oblast when they found the ancient settlement and a total of 45 items of archaeological significance. All the items were taken to the archeological museum of Akmola Oblast for further study. Read more.

Archaeologists digging at an Iron Age settlement are keeping the location a secret in a bid to stop people with metal detectors spoiling the site.

The settlement in Guernsey dates back 2,000 years and it is thought mostly pottery will be found.

Archaeologist Dr Phil de Jersey said keeping it a secret gave them a “head start”.

He added there had been a “growing problem” with people using metal detectors on land without permission.

The dig is expected to last up to three weeks.

Dr de Jersey said: “I wanted to be a bit cautious at the start. Read more.

Evidence of early Polynesian settlement dating back to the early 1300s has been uncovered within a stone’s throw of central Whitianga, in a discovery of national significance.

A team of five archaeologists has spent two months at one of the Coromandel Peninsula’s largest excavation sites by the Taputapuatea stream, at a housing development on the outskirts of the Coromandel town.

According to archaeologist Andrew Hoffman, the site has been identified as a Polynesian settlement from the 1300s used for cooking and gardening. It also had a specialist working area for making tools and repairing waka. Among the hundreds of artefacts unearthed are rare large sized hangi oven stones, moa fish hooks, basalt and chert rock tools, a large midden, and flakes of unused rock. Read more.

An Iron Age hearth and evidence of a Bronze Age settlement have been uncovered in Porthleven by builders working on a new housing development.

Archaeologists have been working alongside the contractors developing land off Shrubberies Hill and have been excited by the find.

Community archaeologist Richard Mikulski said of the Iron Age hearth: “It’s quite a big deal. It’s the first ever find in Cornwall and there’s only one other example that we know of that’s sort of similar found in the south west, if not the country, found at Glastonbury at the end of the 19th century. Read more.

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An archaeological dig conducted by Queensland University in 2014, in the location of Mouttes in Alambra, in Nicosia District, has confirmed the existence of an ancient settlement revealing remains of buildings and tombs dating back to the Bronze Age.

The research conducted during 2014 is the continuation of the work that had been conducted by the Australian mission at the same site during 2012, a Department of Antiquities press release says.

It is further noted that the site “had been identified as preserving the remains of an Early and Middle Bronze Age settlement already since the 19th century”. Read more.

Remnants of a burnt ancient city, believed to be dating back to 2nd century BC, have been found in an archaeological site in Tarighat, nearly 30 km from here. The “gutted settlement” reminds one the famed Roman city of Pompeii that got buried under 13-20 feet of ash and pumice in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD.

The remains of the charred city have been found around 20 feet below Tarighat archaeological site which came into national focus when excavation had brought to surface a 2,500-year-old urban centre in 2013. Read more.