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Posts tagged "shipwrecks"

GULF OF THE FARALLONES NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY (AP) — Federal researchers are exploring several underwater sites where ships sank while navigating in the treacherous waters west of San Francisco in the decades following the Gold Rush.

Over the past week, a team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration used a remote controlled underwater vehicle, equipped with sonar and video cameras, to examine and record the historic shipwrecks.

The five-day expedition was part of a long-term archaeological survey of the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, which covers about 1,300 square miles of the Pacific Ocean off the Northern California coast. Read more.

Underwater archaeological work in the Mediterranean has uncovered the remains of a port from the Bronze Age, along with 12 shipwrecks estimated to be 2,500 years old.

The remains of these finds are being examined at Selçuk University’s Research Center, which is working to discover the underwater archaeological richness of the Mediterranean along with teams from Warsaw and Naples and the support of the Culture and Tourism Ministry.

The recent finds are attributed to Turkey’s first underwater archaeological research vessel, the Selçuk-1, in Antalya, which was launched by Selçuk University on June 17. Read more.

A St Mary’s underwater explorer believes he’s uncovered two wrecks, one of which could date back to the 14th century and the other from around 400 year later.

Todd Stevens has 30 years experience in the field and has located 15 wrecks so far.

He’s brought “large lumps” of medieval pottery fragments to the surface following his seabed surveying near Nut Rock. Todd says the pottery is clearly from that period with its crude pattern and formation. He’s also found parts of a rudder, chains, mast hoops and an anchor.

The site is near to the only known medieval shipwreck incident recorded in Scilly from 1305.

But there’s also some later 18th century pottery, which Todd believes is European redware, and is very different to the medieval ceramics. Read more.

A group of researchers from İzmir’s Dokuz Eylül University’s Institute of Marine Science and Technology (IMST), who conduct research on sunken ships located between Muğla’s Datça peninsula and Antalya, have discovered eight new sunken ships.

The latest research project by the IMST, which receives funding from the Culture and Tourism Ministry, Development Ministry and Bodrum Municipality, has taken three months to complete.

The institute’s deputy director Associate professor Harun Özdaş said the first stage of the Aegean and Mediterranean research had been finished in 2004, adding: “The main purpose of the project is to expand the inventory of sunken ships. Read more.

HAIDA GWAII, B.C. - A team of archeologists is preparing to descend to the ocean floor off British Columbia’s Haida Gwaii islands, searching for sunken ships and other artifacts that could offer new clues about life in the area hundreds or even thousands of years ago.

Four underwater archeologists from Parks Canada, along with a volunteer from the Underwater Archeological Society of B.C., will set out for a two-week mission beginning Monday to explore the Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve. Read more.

A remotely operated vehicle will dive into the Gulf of Mexico to explore three mysterious shipwrecks that may be up to 200 years old, and you can watch the expedition live in a webcast.

Tomorrow (April 24), the ROV will explore debris and artifacts from one of the three ships, which litter the seafloor near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. You can watch the shipwreck expedition webcast on Live Science.

The shipwreck investigation is part of an ongoing exploration of the Gulf of Mexico seafloor by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Okeanos Explorer research vessel. Researchers will search for clues as to whether the ships sunk together and if the wrecks may be significant national maritime heritage sites. Read more.

A Hampshire-based charity has been given £1.1m to research the UK’s 1,000-plus forgotten World War One shipwrecks.

The Maritime Archaeology Trust said it will use the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) money to improve the knowledge of archaeologically significant sites.

The information collected by the Forgotten Wrecks of the First World War project will then be put online.

It is thought the south coast could have 700 relatively unknown wrecks.

These include merchant and naval ships, passenger, troop and hospital ships, ports, wharfs and crashed aircraft.

The four-year project is due to commence this spring. Read more.

The shipwrecks of some seafaring cultures have never been found—but not for lack of looking.

Finding modern ships lost at sea, even with the help of radar, sonar, and satellites, can be a herculean task. But trying to find a shipwreck from thousands of years ago is even harder. It’s like looking for a wooden needle in a haystack after part of the needle has rotted away.

Underwater archaeologists keep looking, though, because finding one of these shipwrecks could yield a treasure trove of information—from how ancient peoples built their vessels to where they traveled and who their trading partners were. Read more.