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Posts tagged "skeleton"

The remains of a man buried 3,800 years ago in a richly decorated California grave bear some unusual but unmistakable features — a protruding brow, a lantern jaw, thick leg and arm bones, and teeth so crowded together that at one point they erupt in rows three deep.

According to a new study of the ancient skeleton, they are signs of acromegaly, a rare disorder of the endocrine system that’s similar to gigantism.

The California man is among the very few examples of acromegaly ever found in the archaeological record, and it’s the oldest ever identified, according to Dr. Eric Bartelink, a physical anthropologist at California State University, Chico. Read more.

Archaeologists from a North East University have found a complete 3,200-year-old skeleton with cancer and say the discovery could help show how the disease has evolved.

Durham University PhD student Michaela Binder found the remains of the wealthy man aged 25-35 in a tomb close to the River Nile in Sudan last year.

The bones showed evidence of metastatic carcinoma – cancer which has spread from where it started.

Analysis proved it came from a malignant soft-tissue tumour and spread across large parts of the body, making it the oldest convincing”example of metastatic cancer ever found, the authors of the study, which is published in the academic journal PLOS One, said. Read more.

Archaeologists have discovered a 900-year-old murder victim during a dig at the Scottish Seabird Centre in East Lothian.

They found the skeleton of a young man dating from the 12th or 13th Centuries while investigating Kirk Ness, which was the site of a North Berwick church.

Analysis revealed he was fatally stabbed four times in the back, twice in the left shoulder and in the ribs.

The archaeologists said he was over the age of 20.

They said his build was slightly bigger than average and his shoulder was worn down, suggesting he might have been an archer. Read more.

THE SKELETON of a small Bronze Age man with worn-away teeth was today removed from his grave a metre beneath a primary school playground.

The 4000-year-old remains were found by archaeologists surveying Victoria Primary School in Newhaven, Edinburgh, ahead of a proposed school extension.

The archaeologists stumbled upon the well-preserved bones in late January while looking for evidence of the village’s medieval harbour.

The body was curled up in a foetal position common in the Bronze Age, and positioned alongside a pottery food or drink vessel to sustain them in the journey to the next world. Read more.

Bulgarian archaeologists have uncovered the remains of a woman that appears to have been buried pregnant 6000 years ago.

The found – described as highly unusual - was made in a newly discovered necropolis in the famous village of Svestari in north-east Bulgaria.

A total of five skeletons were discovered in the necropolis, all of them buried in unusual position – with their legs bound and their heads facing southwards, the BGNES news agency informs.

The buried woman had exquisite pearl ornaments, according to Professor Diana Gergova, who led the dig. Read more.

A human ancestor characterized by “robust” jaw and skull bones was a muscular creature with a gorilla-like upper body and more adaptive to its environment than previously thought, scientists have discovered.

Researchers found a partial skeleton—including arm, hand, leg and foot fragments—dated to 1.34 million years old and belonging to Paranthropus boisei at the Olduvai Gorge World Heritage fossil site in Tanzania. The find, published in the latest edition of the scientific journal PLOS ONE, represents one of the most recent occurrences of P. boisei before its extinction in East Africa.

"This is the first time we’ve found bones that suggest that this creature was more ruggedly built—combining terrestrial bipedal locomotion and some arboreal behaviors—than we’d previously thought," Read more.

An ancient skeleton, thought to date back to Roman Britain, has been discovered in a sewer trench.

Contractors from Yorkshire Water were installing sewers in Norton near Malton when they made the discovery.

Chris Pole, of Northern Archaeological Associates, said the site was formerly a Roman cemetery.

The “remarkably intact” skeleton has been removed for tests to determine its age, sex, and, if possible, a cause of death.

Two new sewers were being installed under Sutton Street in the village of Norton-on-Derwent when the skeleton was found two metres below the road. Read more.

A 2,000-year-old skeleton with a mask on its face has been found in the Aizanoi ancient city in Kütahya, during excavations in the area which have been continuing for two years now with new findings emerging.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency, excavation group president Pamukkale University Archeology academic Elif Özer said the excavations had been ongoing since 2011, and many findings had been excavated from the area. The skeleton was excavated from the northern part of the necropolis eras.

The mask of the skeleton was found along with the face and the body. This mask is thought to have been used in the burial ceremonies in Aizonoi, said Özer. Read more.