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Posts tagged "skeleton"

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An ancient skeleton unearthed in Israel may contain the oldest evidence of brain damage in a modern human.

The child, who lived about 100,000 years ago, survived head trauma for several years, but suffered from permanent brain damage as a result, new 3D imaging reveals.

Given the brain damage, the child was likely unable to care for himself or herself, so people must have spent years looking after the little boy or girl, according to the researchers who analyzed the 3D images. People from the child’s group left funerary objects in the youngster’s burial pit as well, the study authors said. Read more.

A HUMAN skeleton possibly dating from Anglo Saxon times was discovered during an archaeological dig in Manuden.

The remains were found close to the main road in one of 10 test pits that were dug in gardens of homes around the village.“The skeleton is thought to be male, about 6ft tall and it was a Christian burial as his hands were crossed over his pelvis,” said Fiona Bengtsen, chairman of Manuden and Berden History Society.

“As the pits are only one metre square only part of the body was visible. It was right at the bottom of the pit as the students were about to close and backfill the pit so photographs were hurriedly taken and samples of soil taken before the pit was closed. Read more.

Human remains, thought to be that of of a 3,000 year old baby have been found during archaeological works at Tlachtga, on the Hill of Ward, Athboy.

The remains were found at the base of a 1.5m ditch at the site. It is believed the fully-intact skeleton is of a baby between seven-10 months old but it is not thought the child was the victim of any human sacrifice on the ritualistic site.

The remains will now be taken to the School of Archaeology at University College Dublin for further examination.

Describing it as “an exciting find,”  lead archaeologist on the site, Dr Stephen Davis,  said: “We may never know what caused the death of the child. Read more.

It is believed that a skeleton discovered on an archaeological dig in East Lothian may be that of an Irish Viking king.

Olaf Guthfrithsson was the King of Dublin and Northumbria from 934 to 941. Archaeologists think the skeleton could belong to him or one of the members of his entourage.

The remains, which were excavated by AOC Archaeology Group at Auldhame in East Lothian in 2005, are those of a young adult male who was buried with a number of items indicating his high rank. These include a belt similar to others from Viking Age Ireland. Read more.

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A skeleton found in East Sussex is the first discovered of a man likely to have been involved in battles at the time of the 1066 Norman invasion.

Skeleton 180, dug up from a medieval cemetery, was thought to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264 but is now known to be 200 years older.

Experts say the discovery could prompt a new re-evaluation of what happened in Britain in the aftermath of 1066.

"It is shocking," said Edwina Livesey of Sussex Archaeological Society.

"When I heard the news I was completely gobsmacked."

The skeleton, which has six fatal sword injuries on the back of his skull, was sent to experts at the University of York as part of preparations to celebrate the 750th anniversary of the Battle of Lewes. Read more.

Mexican officials say they plan to extract the entire skeleton of a teenage girl who nearly 13,000 years ago toppled into a deep hole in a Mexican cave and died.

Archaeologist Pilar Luna said Monday that so far only a molar and a fragment of a rib have been removed from the underground cave where the remains were found in 2007. Divers who found the remains named the girl Naia.

Luna says that once recovered, the remains will be studied and then displayed, probably in Quintana Roo state where the teenage girl was found.

The discovery of the girl’s skeleton is bolstering the long-held theory that humans arrived in the Americas by way of a land bridge from Asia. (source)

The ancient skeleton of a teenage girl found in an underwater cave in Mexico may be the missing link that solves the long-standing mystery behind the identity of the first Americans, researchers say.

These findings, the first time researchers have been able to connect an early American skeleton with modern Native American DNA, suggest the earliest Americans are indeed close relatives of modern Native Americans, scientists added.

The newfound skeleton was named “Naia,” after Greek water spirits known as naiads. The bones are the nearly intact remains of a small, delicately built teenage girl who stood about 4 feet 10 inches (149 centimeters) tall and was about 15 or 16 years old at the time of her death, based on the development of her skeleton and teeth. Read more.

Archaeologists in Poland say they have discovered a skeleton with a brick stuck into the mouth — evidence that the subject was believed to be a vampire.

Dated to the 16th-17th century, the grave was unearthed during excavations in the town of Kamien Pomorski, in northwestern Poland, the Kamienskie.info website reported.

In addition to the brick, which was wedged so violently into the mouth to knock out the upper teeth, the skeleton featured a leg with a hole likely made from a puncture. This would suggest the leg had been staked to the ground to prevent the individual from rising from its grave. Read more.