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Posts tagged "south africa"

In contrast to the adage, third time lucky, a Simon Fraser University archaeology student has already been twice lucky in helping to unearth ancient hominid finds in a well-hidden South African cave.

Actually, this spring, luck had little or nothing to do with Marina Elliott’s recovery of another 320 bones in addition to the 1,200 she helped find in the same cave last fall.

"There certainly were again some very exciting fossils found in our latest caving adventure. But, unfortunately, I can’t tell you what they are yet. Stay tuned!" says Elliott. In the first trip, one of the highlights was the retrieval of a palm-sized section of skull. Read more.

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PARIS — He may be called Little Foot, but for human evolution researchers he’s a big deal: His is the most complete skeleton known of an early member of the human lineage. Ever since the skeleton was discovered in a South African cave in the 1990s and named for its relatively small foot bones, researchers have been fiercely debating how old it is, with estimates ranging from about 2 million years to more than 3 million. A new geological study of the cave concludes that Little Foot is at least 3 million years old. If correct, that would mean he is old enough to be a direct ancestor of today’s humans, and could shift South Africa to the forefront of human evolution. Read more.

The “Rising Star Expedition”, known for its recent recovery of one of the largest troves of hominin (early human) fossils ever discovered in one place, is now ambitiously seeking new early-career scientists to study the more than 1,200 fossil elements retrieved from the site and now housed at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits University) in Johannesburg, South Africa.

"The fossil material is an exceptional sample representing most of the parts of the skeleton, and our first task is to describe the material and place it into the context of hominin evolution," says John Hawks, a paleoanthropologist with the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a key member of the team that recovered the fossils during the Fall of 2013.* Read more.

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Squeezing through a gap called the International Postbox and climbing the jagged Dragon’s Back were not in Alia Gurtov’s plans for the fall semester, but she made an exception in order to participate in a wildly successful archaeological expedition into a South African cave.

Over the last three weeks, Gurtov, a UW-Madison graduate student, and five other spelunking scientists have hauled hundreds of fossilized bones—likely the remains of several distant relatives of humans—through a rock crevice barely 18 centimeters wide.

"Every time I stop to think about what I’m involved in, I am almost overwhelmed by my incredibly great fortune," she said via email during a break. "Luckily, there are so many details to attend to in my daily life that I can maintain a reasonable level of excitement." Read more.

A harrowing expedition into the tiniest recesses of a cave system begins today in South Africa. The effort aims to recover recently discovered fossils of a yet-to-be-identified member of the human family.

Over the next several weeks, the expert team, directed by National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Lee Berger of South Africa’s University of Witwatersrand, will delve into the Rising Star cave system outside Johannesburg to carefully retrieve the fossils.

Berger’s team made headlines in 2010 with the announcement of the discovery of two skeletons of a new, two-million-year-old hominid species the scientists named Australopithecus sediba. Those finds were made at a site called Malapa Cave, northwest of Johannesburg. Read more.

A 350-million-year-old fossilised scorpion discovered in South Africa is the oldest known land animal to have lived on Gondwana, part of Earth’s former supercontinent, a university said Monday.

The new species, named Gondwanascorpio emzantsiensis, provides tantalizing clues about the development of life before Earth’s continents broke apart to form the globe that is familiar to us today, scientists said.

It is the earliest evidence yet of terrestrial animals on Gondwana, a land mass that included present-day Africa, South America and Australia and formed the southern part of a supercontinent called Pangaea.

So far evidence of such early land life had only been found on the northern part of Pangaea —- “Laurasia,” which is today North America and Asia. Read more.

For the first time, the iconic hominid (early pre-human) fossil finds of the famous Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site (COHWHS) in South Africa will belong, in a very literal way, to the world’s public beginning Friday, July 26, 2013. 

Up until now, access to the originals and casts of the fossils were the sole prerogative of select scientists and scholars involved in researching them. Now, casts, or replicas, of the original fossils, made by specially trained members of the local communities, will be sold and distributed to members of the interested public. Read more.

A towering “rain control” site, where shamans would have asked the gods to open up the skies centuries ago, has been discovered in South Africa.

Located in a semiarid area of the country, near Botswana and Zimbabwe, the site of Ratho Kroonkop (RKK) sits atop a 1,000-foot-tall (300 meters) hill and contains two naturally formed “rock tanks.” These tanks are depressions in the rock created when water weakens the underlying sandstone. When the scientists excavated one of them, they found over 30,000 animal specimens, including the remains of rhinoceros, zebra and even giraffe.

"What makes RKK special is that every piece of faunal material found at RKK can in some way be linked to rain control," researcher Simone Brunton, a doctoral candidate at the University of Cape Town, wrote in an email to LiveScience. Read more.