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Posts tagged "tomb"

Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Corinth, Greece, have discovered a tomb dating back around 2,800 years that has pottery decorated with zigzagging designs.

The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea.

The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the sarcophagus, they found a single individual had been buried inside, with only fragments of bones surviving. Read more.

Two sphinxes weighing around 1.5 tons each will not be moved from the entrance to the tomb at Ancient Amphipolis currently being excavated by archaeologists.

It has also been decided that a mosaic displaying black and white rhombus shapes will not be moved either, Kathimerini has been told.

Technical work began on Monday at the tomb in Central Macedonia, northern Greece, to ensure there will be no collapse or other damage as archaeologists attempt to enter the tomb and discover what lies inside.

There are indications that the tomb has been raided in the past but archaeologists are not yet in a position to confirm this. Read more.

A large rectangular tomb in the village of Asuka in Nara Prefecture, may have been built in a rare pyramid shape, archaeologists say.

The Miyakozuka tomb is believed to have been built in the latter half of the sixth century. It was likely a terraced pyramid made of multiple stone layers, experts at the municipal education board and Kansai University’s Archaeological Research Institute said Wednesday.

The tomb may have been influenced by ancient tumuli built near the border between China and North Korea, given the similar structure, the experts said. Read more.

Archaeologists have unearthed a vast ancient tomb in Greece, distinguished by two sphinxes and frescoed walls and dating to 300-325 B.C., in the country’s northeast Macedonian region, the government said on Tuesday.

It marks a significant discovery from the early Hellenistic era, although a Culture Ministry official said there was no evidence yet to suggest a link to Alexander the Great, who died in 323 B.C. after an unprecedented military campaign through the Middle East, Asia and northeast Africa, or his family.

The official said the Amphipolis site, situated about 100 km (65 miles) northeast of Greece’s second-biggest city Thessaloniki, appeared to be the largest ancient tomb to have been discovered in Greece. Read more.

A wall painting, dating back over 4,300 years, has been discovered in a tomb located just east of the Great Pyramid of Giza.

The painting shows vivid scenes of life, including boats sailing south on the Nile River, a bird hunting trip in a marsh and a man named Perseneb who’s shown with his wife and dog.

While Giza is famous for its pyramids, the site also contains fields of tombs that sprawl to the east and west of the Great Pyramid. These tombs were created for private individuals who held varying degrees of rank and power during the Old Kingdom (2649-2150 B.C.), the age when the Giza pyramids were built. Read more.

Some of the earliest evidence of a human parasite infection has been unearthed in an ancient burial site in Syria.

The egg of a parasite that still infects people today was found in the burial plot of a child who lived 6,200 years ago in an ancient farming community.

"We found the earliest evidence for a parasite [that causes] Schistosomiasis in humans,” said study co-author Dr. Piers Mitchell, a biological anthropologist at the University of Cambridge in England. The oldest Schistosoma egg found previously, in Egyptian mummies, was dated to 5,200 years ago. Read more.

Archaeologists working in the Tambo Valley in the southern region of Arequipa recently discovered a tomb built by members of the Tiahuanaco culture.

El Comercio reports that a team of archaeologists from Wroclaw University and Poland and the Universidad Católica de Santa Maria in Arequipa found the tomb near the town of Punta de Bombon. Though the tomb had apparently been looted by antiquities traders, investigators were able to recover human remains as well as several other significant artifacts.

According to El Comercio, two artifacts found by the team are especially important for archaeologists’ understanding of the Tiahuanaco people: a funerary bundle and a ceramic ceremonial offering. Read more.

Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim has explained the context behind a tomb recently rediscovered in Luxor by a Spanish archaeological mission.
The tomb was first discovered in 1904 by Sir Robert Mond, but Mond didn’t describe the tomb’s architectural style or identify its occupant. The tomb was then abandoned and became buried beneath the sands. Egyptologists looked for it subsequently, but their efforts failed.

"It is a very mysterious tomb," asserted Ibrahim, adding that the name of the tomb had changed several times since being mentioned in A Topographical Catalogue of the Private Tombs of Thebes, by Alan Gardiner and Arthur Weigall, published in 1913.

The occupant was first known as “Hatashemro.” Then in the 1950s, he was mentioned as “Seremhatrekhyt.” Later studies revealed that Seremhatrekhyt was a title and not the occupant’s name. Read more.