Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "tomb"

A tomb newly excavated at an ancient cemetery in Egypt would have boasted a pyramid 7 meters (23 feet) high at its entrance, archaeologists say.

The tomb, found at the site of Abydos, dates back around 3,300 years. Within one of its vaulted burial chambers, a team of archaeologists found a finely crafted sandstone sarcophagus, painted red, which was created for a scribe named Horemheb. The sarcophagus has images of several Egyptian gods on it and hieroglyphic inscriptions recording spells from the Book of the Dead that helped one enter the afterlife.

There is no mummy in the sarcophagus, and the tomb was ransacked at least twice in antiquity. Human remains survived the ransacking, however. Archaeologists found disarticulated skeletal remains from three to four men, 10 to 12 women and at least two children in the tomb. Read more.

A pre-inca tomb has been found in Arequipa, in the building where Peruvian writer, Mario Vargas Llosa was born. After four days of investigation, the Ministry of Culture has confirmed that the remains date back to the Churajón culture.

The tomb is 1.5 m deep and contains four ceramic pots recognizable as being from the Churajón culture, according to archaeologist Marco López. He said that the Regional Authority of Culture were evaluating whether the tomb would be opened to the public physically or virtually.

Churajón culture was a pre-inca culture that developed on both riverbanks of the Chili River Valley which runs through the current city of Arequipa. Read more.

An archaeological excavation of Ynys Môn’s least known Neolithic chambered tomb – Perthi Duon, west of the village of Brynsiencyn on Anglesey – has begun. The work is being carried out by a team from the Welsh Rock Art Organisation under the direction of Dr George Nash of the University of Bristol and Carol James.

Perthi Duon, considered to be the remains of a portal dolmen, is one of eighteen extant stone chambered monuments that stand within a 1.5 km corridor of the Menai Straits.

The antiquarian Henry Rowlands reports in 1723 that beneath the large capstone were three stones, possibly upright stones or pillars. However, by the beginning of the nineteenth century the monument was in a ruinous state, incorporated into a north-south hedge boundary, itself now removed. Read more.

A Spanish-Italian team carrying out routine excavation work on Luxor’s west bank has stumbled upon what is believed to be the tomb of Maayi, a top governmental official in the 18th dynasty.

Egypt’s antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim told Ahram Online that the tomb was accidentally found by the excavation team via a hole in the wall of tomb number TT109, in the Sheikh Abdel-Gournah area.

Paintings on the tomb’s walls show Maayi in different positions with family members, offering details on his daily life and family relations. Read more.

A US team in Egypt has identified the tomb of pharaoh Sobekhotep I, believed to be the founder of the 13th dynasty 3,800 years ago, the antiquities minister said.

The team from the University of Pennsylvania had discovered the quartzite sarcophagus of Sobekhotep I, which weighed about 60 tonnes, a year ago, but was unable to identify who it belonged to until last week, the ministry said.

Its identity was established after the team found fragments of a slab inscribed with the pharaoh’s name and showed him sitting on a throne, Antiquities Minister Mohamed Ibrahim said in a statement. Read more.

Archaeologists working at the site of an ancient town in the coastal desert of northern Peru made a surprising discovery in late August—a multi chamber tomb from the much later Chimú culture that held the remains of at least four noble musicians and weavers.

Two human sacrifices, seen in this photo, accompanied the tomb’s elite occupants into eternity.

Colored with centuries of patina, these copper crescent knives were discovered in the same chamber as the human sacrifices. They are Inca in style, with handles ending in tiny molded heads—one representing a llama, and the other a human.

Rare figurines carved from algarrobo wood were uncovered in the main chamber. Their faces are stained with cinnabar and copper; each is shown holding a flute.

This double-chambered bottle was designed to whistle as sweetly as a bird. It can be played by blowing into the spout as if it were a flute. Tipping the vessel so that liquid runs from the spout side to the bird side also produces chirps, which vary in tone depending on the volume of liquid.

To hear the sound that flowing liquid makes in this kind of vessel, click here. More.

She was a priestess named Meretites, and he was a singer named Kahai, who performed at the pharaoh’s palace. They lived about 4,400 years ago in an age when pyramids were being built in Egypt, and their love is reflected in a highly unusual scene in their tomb — an image that has now been published in all its surviving color.

The tomb at Saqqara — which held this couple, their children and possibly their grandchildren — has now been studied and described by researchers at Macquarie University’s Australian Center for Egyptology. Among the scenes depicted is a relief painting showing the couple gazing into each other’s eyes, with Meretites placing her right hand over Kahai’s right shoulder. Read more.

A second culturally significant ancient tomb was accidentally uncovered in Medellin, Colombia last Friday.

Municipal workers uncovered the indigenous tomb while repairing water lines in Colombia’s second largest city. The discovery was made in the residential neighborhood of La Colinita de Guayabal according to El Colombiano.

The tomb held numerous ornate burial gifts, including gold jewelry and ceramics, leading archaeologist to believe the ancient tomb belonged to the ‘Aburraes” indigenous tribe. Medellin sits in a narrow valley originally inhabited by the Aburraes Indians. The Aburra Valley was home to the indigenous tribe from 940-to-1540 A.D. Read more.