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Posts tagged "turkey"

The underground secrets of the historic Ani Ruins, an ancient, 5,000-year-old Armenian city located on the Turkish-Armenian border in the eastern province of Kars, have been revealed.

While speaking at the recent “International Ani-Kars Symposium,” history researcher Sezai Yazıcı said secret water channels, undiscovered monk cells, meditation rooms, huge corridors, intricate tunnels, unbelievable traps and corners that make one lose their sense of direction were just some of the unknown underground structures located at the ancient site. Read more.

A man in the Central Anatolian province of Kayseri’s Melikgazi district has discovered an extensive underground structure while cleaning a house that he inherited from his family.

Mustafa Bozdemir, 50, spent 80,000 euros and removed more than 100 trucks of soil to bring the underground area to light. “We thought that it was a single-story house, but it was five stories,” he said.

The house in the Ağırnas neighborhood, where the famous Ottoman architect Sinan lived, was bequeathed Bozdemir, who is living in France, five years ago. He came to see the house at the time and discovered the underground city when cleaning the house. He informed the Kayseri Governor’s Office and the Culture and Tourism Directorate. Examinations showed that the house probably dated back to the Roman era. Read more.

The ancient city of Metropolis, a premier caravan site of yesteryear that was located on major trade routes, will soon begin drawing in visitors from near and afar thanks to significant investments to open the location up to tourism.

Excavations in the ancient city, which is located in İzmir’s Torbalı district, have been carried out by Culture and Tourism Ministry, Celal Bayar University, Sabancı Foundation and Torbalı Municipality. The historic structures in the ancient city have been preserved to a great extent, while necessary investments have been completed for Metropolis to gain the status of an ancient site. The ancient city is expected to open this year. Read more.

Huge sculptures on the world heritage site Mount Nemrut, which have been exposed to open air for more than 2,000 years, will survive with a panorama museum. Imitations of the sculptures will be made for the museum in the case they disappear someday because of climate conditions.

The possible effects of corrosion caused by climate conditions have been on the agenda of the General Directorate of Cultural Heritage and Museums. Following talks with academic organizations about the preservation of these sculptures, the idea of establishing a panorama museum has arisen.

The first steps have been taken for the structure. When the Adıyaman Panorama and Archaeology Museum is finished, visitors will find themselves on Mount Nemrut. Read more.

While Turkish land is enriched by the historical sites of 206 ancient amphitheaters, most of which are left from Roman and Byzantine times, they are being mistreated by poor and haphazard restoration methods.

Turkey is fortunate to sit astride lands which were once part of the Roman and Byzantine empires. By virtue of this fact, the country has the world’s richest collection of ancient amphitheaters. According to some sources, there are 206 such ancient theaters in Turkey that are left from the Roman period. This figure is much greater than in any other country. However, the attention these precious monuments receive from the authorities is scant, while the recent restoration work carried out at these cultural sites shows obvious signs of the mistreatment to which they have been subject. Read more.

A baby rattle has been found in the Kültepe Kaniş-Karum trade colony, where excavations have been continuing since 1948 in the central Anatolian province of Kayseri.

A team from Ankara University Archaeology Department, headed by Professor Fikri Kulakoğlu, has been working in the area and unearthed the rattle, which dates back to 4,000 B.C.

Kulakoğlu said works had been continuing there for 69 years. He said, “Archaeological excavations have been carried out in Kültepe since 1948. Here it is possible to find what we [commonly] find in houses today. Read more.

The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has returned 10 illegally traded historical artifacts from Lydia, an Iron Age empire in western Turkey, to the Turkish mission in Washington.

Returning the items, which were estimated to have originated in the western province of Manisa and date back to the first and third centuries A.D., to the Turkish Embassy came during a joint presentation between officials from the FBI and Turkish mission in Washington on Aug. 5.

The artifacts included grave stones and sacrifice stelas, which are stone or wooden slabs on which Lydians would inscribe the sacrifices of animals or possessions that deceased people had made during their lives, used in funeral or commemorative services. Read more.

Fresh off of gaining two new entries to the UNESCO World Heritage List, Turkey is more eager than ever to exercise greater caution regarding access to ancient sites in an effort to avoid the fate that has befallen other ancient sites damaged by 21st-century tourism.

“A balance must be achieved between attracting tourists keen to visit Turkey’s classical heritage and protecting ancient sites from being harmed,” Professor Neslihan Dostoğlu, head of Istanbul Kültür University’s Architecture Department, said in the wake of the northwestern city of Bursa and its historical Cumalıkızık district being added to the UNESCO World Heritage List last month in Doha.

Having presided over the UNESCO project for Bursa and Cumalıkızık, Dostoğlu said a more controlled and conscious protection of the areas would take place under the United Nations body. Read more.