Archaeological News

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Posts tagged "uncle tom's cabin"

Archaeologists have discovered what they think are remains of a barn or blacksmith workshop in North Bethesda that could date to the days of Josiah Henson, a former slave whose autobiography inspired the novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

Looking for evidence of what slave life in Maryland was like, archaeologists with the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission Montgomery Parks and the PBS program “Time Team America” began exploring the Josiah Henson Special Park on Monday. They found evidence of a buried foundation that may have existed in the late 1700s and early 1800s, when Henson worked on the homestead for landowner Isaac Riley.

The dig could accelerate fact-finding efforts that started in 2006, when Montgomery County bought the historic site from private owners. Since then, it has been open to the public for tours of what was Riley’s home, parts of which date to the early 1800s, and of the grounds where Henson worked. Read more.

DRESDEN, ONT.—The mapping of unmarked graves at the Uncle Tom’s Cabin historic site in southwestern Ontario has been delayed by the weather.

A search using ground-penetrating radar was set for Thursday in Dresden, Ont., at the request of the Ontario Heritage Trust, but it has been postponed because of rain.

Edward Eastaugh, archeology supervisor at the University of Western Ontario in London, says ground conditions play a major factor in using the technology.

The work is now set for next Tuesday and Wednesday.

The site in Dresden is home to two historic cemeteries belonging to the British American Institute and the Henson family.

Eastaugh says the cemeteries are still in use, so the map will ensure unmarked graves are not dug up. Read more.

DRESDEN, ONT. Archeologists plan to begin a high-tech search Thursday for lost graves at the Uncle Tom’s Cabin historic site in southwestern Ontario.

The site in Dresden is home to two historic cemeteries belonging to the British American Institute and the Henson family.

Although many tombstones are visible at the two cemeteries, their positions do not always precisely mark the location of the underlying graves.

Archeologists from the University of Western Ontario and the Ontario Heritage Trust will use ground-penetrating radar in their search of the site.

Josiah Henson was one of the founders of a settlement for fugitive slaves at Dresden in the 1830s and his name became synonymous with the character Uncle Tom in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”  Read more.